Restaurants in Maine

Not every dish is vegetarian-friendly at this eclectic Bayside hole-in-the-wall, but the multi-page menu is so vast and varied, vegetarians end up with some two-dozen entrees to choose from. When Silly’s opened in 1988, most people thought a “vegan” was an alien from Star Trek.

Lifted out of Greenwich Village in 1960 and plunked down in working-class Lewiston, Guthrie’s is a bohemian café with a menu that skews southwestern.

The New England outpost of lauded chef and plant-food evangelist Matthew Kenney, The Gothic puts a smart, contemporary spin on vegetarian cuisine. Small plates let locally grown and foraged morsels speak for themselves.

Chef and owner Dan Sriprasert’s veggie Thai restaurant has all the curries, stir fry, and noodle dishes you’d expect, and Sriprasert goes in heavy on soy meats, ginger, lemongrass, and tamari.

About a 30-minute drive from the tourist traps of Bar Harbor, this no-frills waterfront seafood joint specializes in reasonably priced, freshly caught lobsters.

With just 20 seats in all (four of which are at the bar), Middle Street newcomer Bresca is one of Portland’s most coveted reservations—with good reason. Owner-chef Krista Kern, a former pastry chef for Guy Savoy in Paris and Las Vegas, strikes a rare balance between comfort and fine dining.

The Maine Dining Room restaurant at downtown Freeport’s Harraseeket Inn is a source of local pride; James Beard Award–winning chef Sam Hayward (now at Fore Street) first helped make a culinary name for the Harraseeket in the early ‘90s, and dishes like halibut encrusted in fresh horseradish and f

A local favorite on Mount Desert Island, this New American restaurant emphasizes organic local produce and fresh seafood from the coast of Maine.

In a region with so many seasonal restaurants, Grissini stands out for being open year-round and for its refined Tuscan food. The space sports white-clothed tables and a stone-lined fireplace. In warmer summer months, they utilize a patio with umbrellas and a white picket fence.

Easily identified by its famous giant neon sign, Moody’s endures as the rest stop of choice on Maine’s mid-coast highway.

The food is nothing fancy—fish chowder and the like—but the breezy Maine ambience is the real deal.

The Clam Shack has been a summertime tradition since 1968. That’s when Richard Jacques debuted his seafood hut above the Kennebunk River. In 2000, Jacques sold the shack and adjacent Clam Shack Seafoods to local Steve Kingston.

Run by the husband-and-wife duo of Steve and Michelle Corry, this farm-to-table restaurant serves up contemporary American dishes with an emphasis on fresh seafood.

To passersby, the no-frills seafood shack won't look like much, but the "fisherman's lunch"— a cup of clam chowder with a lobster roll—is as good as it gets.

No self-respecting food-lover on a tour of Maine would skip a visit to this restaurant, only three miles (yet worlds away) from Ogunquit’s busy downtown.