Maine

Hotels in Maine

Think New England lodging, and it’s easy to imagine a lot of charming B&Bs and inns. And while you’ll find those among the best Maine hotels, there are also bigger, and luxurious places to stay, as well as an assortment of mainstream brand names. In Kennebunkport, along the coast, is where you’ll find the plushest accommodations. Check out a few of the best hotels in Maine.
At Captain Lord Mansion—a pale yellow 1812 folly with Federal-era antiques and stately fireplaces—you can sip iced tea in the shade of the chestnut trees. Chebeague Island Inn is a Maine hotel offers a blend of city and coastal charms: The 1920s Greek Revival inn sits on Chebeague Island in Casco Bay, a 25-minute water taxi ride from Portland. Great for leaf-peeping in the fall. The Stage Neck Inn is set on a rocky bluff between York Harbor and the Atlantic Ocean. The 58-room Maine hotel is a New England classic: shake roofs, white-trimmed windows, and British colonial furniture alongside the beachfront gardens (and, on a more contemporary side, two pools). Stays include a full breakfast, as well as hot cider and cookies served in the fireside lobby.

This 1891 inn, a sister property to the nearby White Barn, is set right on Mother’s Beach overlooking the steel-blue waters of the Atlantic. Purchased and overhauled in 1999, it has the same level of studied luxury as its award-winning sibling—but feels much more informal.

Try a classic sporting camp stay in one of the 18 cabins (meals are served in the main lodge), which has a sandy lake beach.

Located in the western Maine town of Bethel, this Broad Street Historic District inn offers opportunities to golf in the summer, watch the leaves change color in the autumn, and ski, dogsled, or snowmobile in the winter at the nearby Sunday River Ski Resort.

Our Place is a grey, wood-paneled compound from Marnelle and Gordon Bubar that resides on the island of North Haven, a ferry ride away from Rockland on Maine’s central coast.

Set on a rocky bluff between York Harbor and the Atlantic Ocean, the Stage Neck Inn is designed in an old New England style, with shake roofs, white-trimmed windows, and beachfront gardens.

Cottage comfort gets ultrastylish at this 32-room inn compound, set on 22 sloping acres fronting scenic Penobscot Bay.

Situated in an 1860 Federal-style residence, the inn offers ocean views, an eclectic library, and manicured gardens.

Chebeague Island Inn is a tasteful, pared-down vision of grand seaside living—massive fieldstone fireplace, board games, and overstuffed chairs in the great room lobby and a wide porch made for watching boats and sipping stiff cocktails at sunset.

Frost Mountain Yurts offers a year-round outdoor escape in western Maine, complete with an unusual setting that’s devoid of modern conveniences like electricity and running water.

Though it isn’t as hyped as the coast, inland Maine is spectacular, with thousands of lakes and ponds, acres of cool pine forests, and countless small, uncrowded towns where “the real Maine” is still found.

Located on Casco Bay, about an hour'a drive from Portland, this coastal resorts has harbor views and a variety of family-friendly activities, including a children's summer camp, kayaking, and fishing cruises.

One of Maine’s larger ski resorts features eight interconnected mountains and 743 acres of trails. Sunday River’s Boundary-to-Boundary policy encourages additional off-trail exploration, as long as it falls within the property’s expansive perimeter.

It’s no surprise that Maine’s top-rated Relais & Châteaux hotel is located in the toniest summer community of them all—Kennebunkport—and just two minutes as the gull flies from the Bush family compound on Walker’s Point.

This longtime hunting and fishing lodge on Moosehead Lake resides on an 11,000-acre nature preserve. John Willard and his family have run the resort since the late ’60s, presiding over a handful of wooden cabins that range in size from one to four bedrooms, all with wood-burning stoves.

Built in 1793, this landmark inn on Northwest Harbor is on the National Register of Historic Places. It has since been restored, but original details like exposed wooden beams have been kept intact, and an old-school aesthetic still prevails.