Maine

Hotels in Maine

Think New England lodging, and it’s easy to imagine a lot of charming B&Bs and inns. And while you’ll find those among the best Maine hotels, there are also bigger, and luxurious places to stay, as well as an assortment of mainstream brand names. In Kennebunkport, along the coast, is where you’ll find the plushest accommodations. Check out a few of the best hotels in Maine.
At Captain Lord Mansion—a pale yellow 1812 folly with Federal-era antiques and stately fireplaces—you can sip iced tea in the shade of the chestnut trees. Chebeague Island Inn is a Maine hotel offers a blend of city and coastal charms: The 1920s Greek Revival inn sits on Chebeague Island in Casco Bay, a 25-minute water taxi ride from Portland. Great for leaf-peeping in the fall. The Stage Neck Inn is set on a rocky bluff between York Harbor and the Atlantic Ocean. The 58-room Maine hotel is a New England classic: shake roofs, white-trimmed windows, and British colonial furniture alongside the beachfront gardens (and, on a more contemporary side, two pools). Stays include a full breakfast, as well as hot cider and cookies served in the fireside lobby.

It’s no surprise that Maine’s top-rated Relais & Châteaux hotel is located in the toniest summer community of them all—Kennebunkport—and just two minutes as the gull flies from the Bush family compound on Walker’s Point.

This longtime hunting and fishing lodge on Moosehead Lake resides on an 11,000-acre nature preserve. John Willard and his family have run the resort since the late ’60s, presiding over a handful of wooden cabins that range in size from one to four bedrooms, all with wood-burning stoves.

Built in 1793, this landmark inn on Northwest Harbor is on the National Register of Historic Places. It has since been restored, but original details like exposed wooden beams have been kept intact, and an old-school aesthetic still prevails.

The allure of this southern Maine hotel just north of Kennebunkport is the setting—and the food.

The eight-room, Queen Anne Victorian inn dates from 1904 and was purchased by Pamela Parker and Bryan Stevens back in 2010. The establishment opens in mid-May and overlooks Southwest Harbor on Maine’s Mount Desert Island.

This homey, eco-friendly bed and breakfast is set against the backdrop of nature: expansive open spaces, century-old maple trees, and numerous hiking trails. Housed in a late Victorian-era farmhouse, the inn's eight guestrooms are outfitted with antique furniture and accents.

Shingled lodge built in 1887 offering laid-back comfort on Frenchman's Bay, one of Maine's most scenic coastal spots.

Hidden on an island just south of picturesque Wiscasset, away from Vacationland's tourist crowds, this relaxed Maine inn is a world unto itself—and that's a good thing.

Overlooking Frenchman Bay, this pair of inns—one a Tudor mansion, the other a yellow country house with a wide wraparound porch—breathes new life into the traditional New England B&B with a whimsical collection of abstract sculpture dotting the grounds.

This 22-room, telephone-free escape on Maine’s central coast is open Memorial Day through Columbus Day. Gilmore Huston, a successful ship chandler from Bristol, built the white, Greek Revival plantation home in 1850.

The lodge offers prime views of tree-lined Moosehead Lake, with northern section of the Appalachian mountains in the background. In summer, there are opportunities to fly fish, canoe, or even go on a moose safari within minutes of the lodge.

A far cry from the quaint B&Bs for which New England is famous, this full-service seasonal resort in the coastal Maine town of Bar Harbor has 187 guest rooms and suites, most with semi-private balconies and waterfront views.

Located in the village of Castine, just steps from the harbor, this historic boutique hotel offers rural charm with a touch of the modern. The inn's 19 rooms, including three suites, are all located on the second and third floors, and each has its own bathroom.

Just minutes from Portland's scenic Old Port in the Western Promenade neighborhood—renowned for its stately mid-19th-century homes designed by New England architect John Calvin Stevens—this stylish inn stands out from the city's more fusty accommodations.