Maine

Things to do in Maine

You could hike, bike and paddle for miles and miles in Portland, but those aren’t the only things to do in Maine that let you appreciate its great outdoors. But even if you are not an intrepid outdoorsy type you’ll still find plenty of activities to do in Maine.
If any place typifies Maine’s great rugged outdoors, it’s Acadia, one of the top things to do in Maine. It has 120 miles of pine-fringed trails on which moose-spotting is practically guaranteed; miles of sea cliffs formed from granite; and 1,530-foot Cadillac Mountain, the highest peak on the Eastern Seaboard—and the place to see the sunrise of a lifetime. (Good news: you can drive to the top, too.)
The farm-to-table movement is strong in Maine, thanks to the state’s ever-growing number of farmers’ markets that fill fields, town greens, and empty parking lots from York to Presque Isle. They sell everything from freshly tapped maple syrup to fiddleheads, quarts of pea-size blueberries, home-smoked mussels, tangy goat’s cheese, and bunches of wild cosmos and lupines. Among the places to sample local products are Saco, Blue Hill, and Crystal Springs Farm in Brunswick.
Maine’s rugged coast inspired the state’s most famous artists, Winslow Homer and Andrew Wyeth. You can see their masterworks in person at the Portland Art Museum, the I. M. Pei–designed building in the heart of downtown Portland. In addition to work by Maine affiliated artists (also including Edward Hopper), the museums houses early-American furniture and international heavy-hitters such as Picasso, Matisse, and Monet.

Paddle or take a fly-fishing trip on the 178-mile-long Androscoggin River. Watch for hawks, which circle above in search of rainbow trout and bass.

Local captain Joel Rowland will take you on a half- or full-day sail aboard the Tammy Norie, a 42-foot wooden sloop that was originally built in 1964.

One of Maine’s great icons, the picturesque white-stucco, black-capped Portland Headlight marks the entrance to the namesake city’s busy harbor, and lies just seven miles from downtown in Fort Williams Park.

Operating out of a white smokehouse located in the Central Maine foothills just outside of North Anson, the Luce Family have been selling smoked beef, pork, and even venison for about 100 years.

Located in southeast Maine, minutes from the New Hampshire border and just off the Maine Turnpike (i-95), this roadside stand on the Bluestar Memorial Highway is open from May 1 until the moment they sell out of Christmas trees (usually mid-Decmeber).

Fittingly located just steps from the water’s edge on Custom House Wharf, this busy studio-cum-retail shop makes one thing: sporty, one-of-a-kind totes sewn from recycled racing sails.

Visitors to Ogunquit walk off their lobster roll consumption along the cliffs of Marginal Way, a paved path that wraps around rocky shores, along the margin of the land.

A chalkboard hangs above the counter at this Portland cafe, displaying a hand-written menu of drinks, soups, sandwiches, and salads.

Camden Hills State Park is open year-round, with a variety of activities available across its 5,500 acres, from relatively low-exertion (bird-watching, picnicking) to downright athletic (cross-country skiing, off-road biking).

Ted Santarelli, John Amlaw, and Gerald Cunningham founded this museum in 1939 to celebrate the region’s rail-riding tradition.

Little Ivy Colby College is home to the largest collection of works by American painter and Pop artist Alex Katz, who has summered in Lincolnville, Maine, since 1954, and who was first introduced to the state when he attended the famous Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture in 1949.

This mountain in western Maine features 550 acres of trails for skiing and snowboarding.

There's a whole lot happening at Spiller Farm. Strawberries, apples, raspberries, potatoes, and other fruits and veggies are grown on the land, and sold at the farm's eponymous market, which also serves sandwiches and snacks.

Award-winning rug-maker Angela Adams may have stores all over the country, but her flagship showroom in Portland is just a few miles from the very island she grew up on, and where inspiration for her naturalistic, timeless designs first bloomed.

The Double-A affiliate of the Boston Red Sox, the Sea Dogs play an average of 70 home games each season at Hadlock Field, just south of the Back Cove.