Madrid

Madrid Travel Guide

A relatively new gallery on the local art scene, Travesia Cuatro moved to its current address in the Justicia neighborhood in 2008, four years after its founding.

Behind its impressive neoclassical façade with the stone busts of playwrights, the Teatro Español stages Spanish and international dramatic works in a grand hall filled with royal-red seats and gilt trim.

Madrid is known for its children's clothing shops, like this Castellana neighborhood boutique that stocks brand-name garments for babies and children up to age six. The stone-and-brick building is located on a tree-lined street.

The shop stocks a range of dresses in amazing prints.

High-end clothing shops line this pedestrian-only street. Scooter (011-34-91-576-47-49) highlights French designers of the moment Vanessa Bruno and Tara Jarmon and Brazilian shoe designer Chie Mihara.

Owners Cecilia Rius and Chavela Herrero lead a design team specializing in one-of-a-kind hats, tiaras, and other accent pieces, such as floral fabric brooches, all arrayed in colorful displays along the walls.

Picasso’s Guernica, depicting Franco’s bombing of civilians in Guernica during the civil war, one of the most celebrated antiwar paintings of all time, makes its permanent home here.

An impressive menu of rejuvenating treatments is offered at this full-service sanctuary (an outpost of an upscale Spanish spa chain).

Madrid’s answer to New York’s Central Park is a warren of paths carved in green with a large, central man-made lake and plenty of space (330 acres) for lolling about. Originally conceived as a royal garden, Retiro has been a public park for 300 years.

Postmodern bar in the corner of a small casino that pours wonderfully acidic Viña Soledad 2005, a white from Bodegas Franco-Españolas ($1.95); the wine is the ideal complement to embuchados with caramelized onion ($4.30).

The windows are filled with candy and shaded under a wide, striped awning at Caramelos Paco, which opened as a grocery shop in 1934. Two years on, owner D. Francisco Moreno Redondo started specializing in chocolates and candies.

Housed in a 19th-century palace, the Museo Nacional de Artes Decorativas (National Museum of Decorative Arts) is located within the bank of museums northwest of the Buen Retiro Park.

Can’t bear to leave Spain’s gustatory pleasures behind? Stop in at this gleaming gourmet deli to stock up on locally made cheeses, olive oils, tinned shellfish, Salamanca and Huelva hams, and other locally produced delicacies.

The designer is known for playing with volume—her clothing is like sculpture.