Madrid Travel Guide

Housed in a 1926 Art Deco building, the Círculo de Bellas Artes (Circle of Fine Arts) is a cultural center that hosts a wide variety of lectures, film screenings, dance and theater performances, classical and contemporary concerts, and art exhibitions showcasing the work of both well-known and em

Located on a traffic-heavy street that’s a main thoroughfare through central Madrid, this Cortefiel location sells women’s and men's apparel, including classically tailored suits.

At Madrid’s best cocktail bar, tuxedoed bartenders wield wooden batons to crack the ice that chills your martini glass, and the devilishly sweet vodka fizz veritably buzzes in your hand.

Opened in 2009 on Picasso’s 128th birthday, this contemporary art gallery presents temporary exhibitions of work by masters like Pablo Picasso and Salvador Dalí.

Located on the site of a ninth-century Moorish fortress, the Palacio Real (Royal Palace) is the official residence of the Spanish royal family. Completely rebuilt after a 1734 fire, the present-day palace is a granite-and-stone Baroque structure with large Tuscan pillars.

Native painter Joaquín Sorolla was a contemporary and friend of John Singer Sargent, and the parallels in their paintings are immediately apparent. (They are so clear, in fact, that two years ago the Thyssen-Bornemisza mounted an entire show around their commonalities).

Counting DJ’s and bartenders among its owners, this casual corner bar is open all day, helping Madrileños ease the transition from coffee to caipirinha.

From Spanish monarchs and popes to sports stars and bullfighters, the Wax Museum displays more than 450 life-sized figures. Many are dressed in original clothing, including the likenesses of Cuba's Fidel Castro and Spanish dictator General Franco.

This storefront-size bar has a formidable list of wines on a chalkboard. The hearty semi-spicy pepper stuffed with beef and béchamel ($1.50) is a standout.

Created in 1981 by Quito-born painter Oswaldo Guayasamín—famous in South America for his politically charged work—these two coordinating murals juxtapose the historical (Mayan-style figures in deep ocher colors) with the modern (bold typography reminiscent of propagandist posters).

Originally an art school established under royal decree in 1744, the Real Academia de Bellas Artes de San Fernando (Royal Academy of Fine Arts of San Fernando) is now home to a collection of work by some of Spain’s most famous artists.

You can find everything from silk handkerchiefs to cotton bandannas mixed in with clothes from the 40’s to the 70’s.

A favorite of fashion designer Carolina Herrera, the Casa Florida flower shop is located in a two-story space within a 19th-century apartment building a block off Paseo de la Castellana.

The property is a boutique, café, and theater all housed within a former brothel.