Madrid

Restaurants in Madrid

Unsurprisingly, Madrid is one of the tapas capitals of the world, and dozens of Madrid restaurants serve the dishes. If you want some of the best the city has to offer, visit eateries like El Tempranillo, located near the Plaza de los Carros on the lively Calle Cava Baja, or the super romantic Celso y Manolo, which specializes in Madrilenian street food as tapas. If you’d like a side of history with your meal, be sure to make a reservation at Restaurante Sobrino de Botín, a nearly 300-years-old Madrid restaurant and one of the world’s oldest eatery. Try delicious dishes like roasted lamb and suckling pig while marveling at the restaurant’s retro surroundings. And being the international city it is, there are also plenty of restaurants in Madrid that specialize in non-Spanish cuisine. Grab a table at Bangkok Thai for a taste of the Far East or dip into the Paella de la Reina for rich Mediterranean cuisine. And whatever you choose, be sure to eat to your heart’s content in this hotbed of top notch cuisine.

The taberna stocks the latest emerging vintages (try wines from the Madrid region).

This Salamanca's Recoletos neighborhood restaurant debuted in 2004, serving Asturian (Northern Spanish) cuisine, stews, and fresh seafood. Unusual dishes by chef Sandro Silva include grilled sea urchin in its own shell and oxtail meatballs.

Akin to (but a bit more polished than) the Sbarro chain found in many American airports, this cafeteria-style eatery serves up Italian fast-food staples: pizza by the slice with a variety of toppings, red-sauce pastas like lasagna and baked ziti. Grab and go or sit and stay—it’s your choice.

Neither folksy nor funky nor fashionable, this brightly bourgeois bar swathed in polished wood is attached to the restaurant inside the Santiago _Bernabéu stadium, home to the Real Madrid soccer team.

This gem in the arsenal of every businessman and artist in town is nevertheless missed by many tourists. Inside the modern, uncluttered Scandinavian-style dining room, walls alternate between bold red, mustard yellow, and carved blond-wood panels.

Order the saucy albóndigas with a glass of vermú de (vermouth on tap) slid across the antique onyx counter at Casa Alberto, in a building where Cervantes once wrote.

The mini-hamburguesas with caramelized onions are some of the best burgers in the world.

Often named among the best seafood restaurant in Spain, O’Pazo is owned by Evaristo Garcia, who also runs Pescaderías Coruñesas, a seafood supplier that provides the restaurant with fresh fish from the Galician coast.

Known for its market-sourced Mediterranean cuisine, Chantarella is headed by chef-brothers Álvaro and Enrique Díaz. The brothers opened the restaurant on Calle Luisa Fernanda in 1999 and moved to this larger space after two years.

Part restaurant and part nightclub, Arola Madrid is located in the Museo Reina Sofia (Queen Sofia Museum), which houses a renowned collection of 20th-century art, including Picasso’s Guernica.

Housed in a former dairy, La Vaquería de Suiza (The Swiss Dairy) smartly changed nothing about the original structure, with its unfinished cement floors and soaring 19th-century glass double doors, but added mismatched rough-hewn wood tables and chairs.

Chef Paco Ron's restaurant combines a lively tapas bar with a handsome basement dining room in various shades of gray.