Madrid

Restaurants in Madrid

Gambas al ajillo (garlic shrimp) has been a specialty at the tiled taberna for some 100 years.

Asiana is one of Madrid's most exciting discoveries. Ring the bell and you'll be whisked down to one of seven candlelit tables in a subterranean space crammed with Ming vases and gilded Buddhas.

Grabbing a quick bite between flights doesn’t have to mean eating unhealthily. These cafés offer fresh-made salads, sandwiches, and juices, which you can either enjoy in the glassed-in modern dining areas, or pack to take on board.  

Housed in a former dairy, La Vaquería de Suiza (The Swiss Dairy) smartly changed nothing about the original structure, with its unfinished cement floors and soaring 19th-century glass double doors, but added mismatched rough-hewn wood tables and chairs.

Part restaurant and part nightclub, Arola Madrid is located in the Museo Reina Sofia (Queen Sofia Museum), which houses a renowned collection of 20th-century art, including Picasso’s Guernica.

Known more for its wine selection than its Mediterranean menu, this lunch-only bistro is located on the mezzanine of a Salamanca wine shop that stocks about 4,500 labels. Inside, the dining room’s pearl tones and dark wood contrast with the more casual high-tops and red chairs in the bar.

Located beside the art gallery Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza, Paradís serves Mediterranean seafood dishes and hosts themed culinary workshops about ingredients like local mushrooms, codfish, and calçots, a type of green onion.

This smart urban grill house flanks the Santiago Bernabéu stadium with a sweeping view of the pitch.

Chef Paco Ron's restaurant combines a lively tapas bar with a handsome basement dining room in various shades of gray.

Located on the shaded Plaza de la Paja, Delic muddles mojitos that are considered among the best in the city.

Standouts at the bustling restaurant and pizzeria include the classic tomato, mozzarella, and basil, as well as the “perico” (pear and jamón ibérico). In warm weather, tables spill out onto the shaded plaza.

Designed by Christian Liaigre, the Lágrimas Negras restaurant is furnished with muted dark-wood furniture, slatted blinds, and low-hung lights enveloped by large red tassels.

At this bar in the Chueca neighborhood, waiters bring a free tapas with each caña—a term for a glass of beer, local wine, or Spanish cider.

The world’s oldest operating restaurant, founded in 1725, Restaurante Botín still roasts suckling pig and lamb in the original oak-fired, cast-iron oven.