Madrid

Restaurants in Madrid

Unsurprisingly, Madrid is one of the tapas capitals of the world, and dozens of Madrid restaurants serve the dishes. If you want some of the best the city has to offer, visit eateries like El Tempranillo, located near the Plaza de los Carros on the lively Calle Cava Baja, or the super romantic Celso y Manolo, which specializes in Madrilenian street food as tapas. If you’d like a side of history with your meal, be sure to make a reservation at Restaurante Sobrino de Botín, a nearly 300-years-old Madrid restaurant and one of the world’s oldest eatery. Try delicious dishes like roasted lamb and suckling pig while marveling at the restaurant’s retro surroundings. And being the international city it is, there are also plenty of restaurants in Madrid that specialize in non-Spanish cuisine. Grab a table at Bangkok Thai for a taste of the Far East or dip into the Paella de la Reina for rich Mediterranean cuisine. And whatever you choose, be sure to eat to your heart’s content in this hotbed of top notch cuisine.

Housed in a former dairy, La Vaquería de Suiza (The Swiss Dairy) smartly changed nothing about the original structure, with its unfinished cement floors and soaring 19th-century glass double doors, but added mismatched rough-hewn wood tables and chairs.

Known more for its wine selection than its Mediterranean menu, this lunch-only bistro is located on the mezzanine of a Salamanca wine shop that stocks about 4,500 labels. Inside, the dining room’s pearl tones and dark wood contrast with the more casual high-tops and red chairs in the bar.

Located beside the art gallery Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza, Paradís serves Mediterranean seafood dishes and hosts themed culinary workshops about ingredients like local mushrooms, codfish, and calçots, a type of green onion.

This smart urban grill house flanks the Santiago Bernabéu stadium with a sweeping view of the pitch.

Chef Paco Ron's restaurant combines a lively tapas bar with a handsome basement dining room in various shades of gray.

Located on the shaded Plaza de la Paja, Delic muddles mojitos that are considered among the best in the city.

Standouts at the bustling restaurant and pizzeria include the classic tomato, mozzarella, and basil, as well as the “perico” (pear and jamón ibérico). In warm weather, tables spill out onto the shaded plaza.

The world’s oldest operating restaurant, founded in 1725, Restaurante Botín still roasts suckling pig and lamb in the original oak-fired, cast-iron oven.

Designed by Christian Liaigre, the Lágrimas Negras restaurant is furnished with muted dark-wood furniture, slatted blinds, and low-hung lights enveloped by large red tassels.

At this bar in the Chueca neighborhood, waiters bring a free tapas with each caña—a term for a glass of beer, local wine, or Spanish cider.

An old-fashioned sweet shop established in 1842, Casa Mira is renowned for its homemade turrón, a traditional Christmas nougat made with almonds, sugar, honey, and egg whites. The shop sells the holiday candy year-round and even supplies the Spanish royal family.

Order tortilla española—runny like a good omelette and slathered with house-made red sauce ($2)—and chase it with the neighborhood’s best bargain: Bodegas Prudencio Larrea’s Los Porrones de Nedurp 2006 (90 cents).

Located inside the Hesperia Madrid hotel, this Michelin two-starred restaurant was opened in 2001 by acclaimed Spanish chef Santi Santamaría.

Located on a side street off the Gran Via, this small, intimate restaurant serves creative Spanish cuisine from chef-owner Juanjo López.