Madrid

Restaurants in Madrid

Unsurprisingly, Madrid is one of the tapas capitals of the world, and dozens of Madrid restaurants serve the dishes. If you want some of the best the city has to offer, visit eateries like El Tempranillo, located near the Plaza de los Carros on the lively Calle Cava Baja, or the super romantic Celso y Manolo, which specializes in Madrilenian street food as tapas. If you’d like a side of history with your meal, be sure to make a reservation at Restaurante Sobrino de Botín, a nearly 300-years-old Madrid restaurant and one of the world’s oldest eatery. Try delicious dishes like roasted lamb and suckling pig while marveling at the restaurant’s retro surroundings. And being the international city it is, there are also plenty of restaurants in Madrid that specialize in non-Spanish cuisine. Grab a table at Bangkok Thai for a taste of the Far East or dip into the Paella de la Reina for rich Mediterranean cuisine. And whatever you choose, be sure to eat to your heart’s content in this hotbed of top notch cuisine.

Just weeks after the launch, adventurous epicures were flocking to the drab Tetuán neighborhood to eat at this 20-seat spot, where pink runners on tables are the only visible stab at “décor.” Influenced both by his apprenticeship at London’s Hakkasan and by Ferran Adrià’s deconstructive cuisine,

Located on the ground level of the Museo del Traje (Costume Museum), Bokado serves inventive Basque cuisine crafted by chefs Mikel and Jesús Santamaría, brothers from San Sebastián.

The lunch spot has a real Valencian making the paella.

The current insider favorite among Madrid’s food and wine elite, Senzone, at the new Hospes hotel in Barrio de Salamanca, brings together the unique talents of 27-year-old chef Francisco Morales—a protégé of avant-garde guru Andoni Aduriz, of San Sebastián’s Mugaritz—and his wife, Rut Cotroneo, t

It may not look like much, but Cisne Azul, steps from Plaza de Chueca, is a mecca for all sorts of exotic mushrooms (to eat, that is).

Offers some two dozen sparkling wines by the glass-just right with the fines de claire oysters from bivalve and caviar purveyor Daniel Sorlut (#67).

Known more for its wine selection than its Mediterranean menu, this lunch-only bistro is located on the mezzanine of a Salamanca wine shop that stocks about 4,500 labels. Inside, the dining room’s pearl tones and dark wood contrast with the more casual high-tops and red chairs in the bar.

Located beside the art gallery Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza, Paradís serves Mediterranean seafood dishes and hosts themed culinary workshops about ingredients like local mushrooms, codfish, and calçots, a type of green onion.

The world’s oldest operating restaurant, founded in 1725, Restaurante Botín still roasts suckling pig and lamb in the original oak-fired, cast-iron oven.

Designed by Christian Liaigre, the Lágrimas Negras restaurant is furnished with muted dark-wood furniture, slatted blinds, and low-hung lights enveloped by large red tassels.

At this bar in the Chueca neighborhood, waiters bring a free tapas with each caña—a term for a glass of beer, local wine, or Spanish cider.

A multilevel, multifunctional Philippe Starck–designed fun house—it’s really two restaurants, a basement dance club, and a throbbing scene around the black etched-glass bar.

Elegant wooden pillars and painted tiles divide the zinc-topped bar from the formal seated dining room at this Goya neighborhood restaurant. The signature cocido madrileño, a meat-and-chickpea stew served in three stages, also comes in a kids’ menu size.