Madrid

Restaurants in Madrid

Unsurprisingly, Madrid is one of the tapas capitals of the world, and dozens of Madrid restaurants serve the dishes. If you want some of the best the city has to offer, visit eateries like El Tempranillo, located near the Plaza de los Carros on the lively Calle Cava Baja, or the super romantic Celso y Manolo, which specializes in Madrilenian street food as tapas. If you’d like a side of history with your meal, be sure to make a reservation at Restaurante Sobrino de Botín, a nearly 300-years-old Madrid restaurant and one of the world’s oldest eatery. Try delicious dishes like roasted lamb and suckling pig while marveling at the restaurant’s retro surroundings. And being the international city it is, there are also plenty of restaurants in Madrid that specialize in non-Spanish cuisine. Grab a table at Bangkok Thai for a taste of the Far East or dip into the Paella de la Reina for rich Mediterranean cuisine. And whatever you choose, be sure to eat to your heart’s content in this hotbed of top notch cuisine.

Lhardy is a grand 19th-century museum piece famous for its burnished interiors and cocido (boiled dinner).

A tiny corridor of a place where embuchados, plates of grilled goat tripe, sizzling and crunchy, with spicy romesco sauce ($6.40) are served with Bodegas Solana de Ramírez Ruíz Valsarte Crianza 2002. The wine is full of sweetness and round in the mouth ($1.80).

Gambas al ajillo (garlic shrimp) has been a specialty at the tiled taberna for some 100 years.

Asiana is one of Madrid's most exciting discoveries. Ring the bell and you'll be whisked down to one of seven candlelit tables in a subterranean space crammed with Ming vases and gilded Buddhas.

Grabbing a quick bite between flights doesn’t have to mean eating unhealthily. These cafés offer fresh-made salads, sandwiches, and juices, which you can either enjoy in the glassed-in modern dining areas, or pack to take on board.  

This smart urban grill house flanks the Santiago Bernabéu stadium with a sweeping view of the pitch.

An old-fashioned sweet shop established in 1842, Casa Mira is renowned for its homemade turrón, a traditional Christmas nougat made with almonds, sugar, honey, and egg whites. The shop sells the holiday candy year-round and even supplies the Spanish royal family.

Order tortilla española—runny like a good omelette and slathered with house-made red sauce ($2)—and chase it with the neighborhood’s best bargain: Bodegas Prudencio Larrea’s Los Porrones de Nedurp 2006 (90 cents).

Batter-fried bacalao is crispest at Casa Revuelta, a tatty dive frozen in time off the stern, arcaded Plaza Mayor, the heart of Hapsburg Madrid.

A block away from Parque Retiro in the upscale Chamberí neighborhood, this corner Italian restaurant is decorated in soft off-whites, Tuscan yellows, and photos of its celebrity diners. Bottles of dried, multicolored pastas hang on the walls.

Easily the swankiest dining option at the airport, El Madroño is set outside Terminal 4’s security area—so it’s the best place to have a pre-board meal with friends or business associates who aren’t traveling with you.

Order featherlight tempura of baby vegetables highlighted with a sweet-tart reduction of sherry vinegar.

Tucked away on a narrow street in the Lavapiés neighborhood, this tiny restaurant serves Mediterranean cuisine inspired by the Spanish coast and countryside.

Located just off the Gran Via, this casual, inexpensive eatery is set on a busy corner in Chueca, the city’s gay village. The two-story dining room is open and airy, with large street-level windows, whitewashed walls, bare-board floors, and pale gray chairs.