Restaurants in Madrid

This smart urban grill house flanks the Santiago Bernabéu stadium with a sweeping view of the pitch.

Standouts at the bustling restaurant and pizzeria include the classic tomato, mozzarella, and basil, as well as the “perico” (pear and jamón ibérico). In warm weather, tables spill out onto the shaded plaza.

Chef Paco Ron's restaurant combines a lively tapas bar with a handsome basement dining room in various shades of gray.

Located on the shaded Plaza de la Paja, Delic muddles mojitos that are considered among the best in the city.

The world’s oldest operating restaurant, founded in 1725, Restaurante Botín still roasts suckling pig and lamb in the original oak-fired, cast-iron oven.

Designed by Christian Liaigre, the Lágrimas Negras restaurant is furnished with muted dark-wood furniture, slatted blinds, and low-hung lights enveloped by large red tassels.

At this bar in the Chueca neighborhood, waiters bring a free tapas with each caña—a term for a glass of beer, local wine, or Spanish cider.

An old-fashioned sweet shop established in 1842, Casa Mira is renowned for its homemade turrón, a traditional Christmas nougat made with almonds, sugar, honey, and egg whites. The shop sells the holiday candy year-round and even supplies the Spanish royal family.

Order tortilla española—runny like a good omelette and slathered with house-made red sauce ($2)—and chase it with the neighborhood’s best bargain: Bodegas Prudencio Larrea’s Los Porrones de Nedurp 2006 (90 cents).

Located on a side street off the Gran Via, this small, intimate restaurant serves creative Spanish cuisine from chef-owner Juanjo López.

Located inside the Hesperia Madrid hotel, this Michelin two-starred restaurant was opened in 2001 by acclaimed Spanish chef Santi Santamaría.

Elegant wooden pillars and painted tiles divide the zinc-topped bar from the formal seated dining room at this Goya neighborhood restaurant. The signature cocido madrileño, a meat-and-chickpea stew served in three stages, also comes in a kids’ menu size.

A multilevel, multifunctional Philippe Starck–designed fun house—it’s really two restaurants, a basement dance club, and a throbbing scene around the black etched-glass bar.

Batter-fried bacalao is crispest at Casa Revuelta, a tatty dive frozen in time off the stern, arcaded Plaza Mayor, the heart of Hapsburg Madrid.