Madrid

Restaurants in Madrid

Unsurprisingly, Madrid is one of the tapas capitals of the world, and dozens of Madrid restaurants serve the dishes. If you want some of the best the city has to offer, visit eateries like El Tempranillo, located near the Plaza de los Carros on the lively Calle Cava Baja, or the super romantic Celso y Manolo, which specializes in Madrilenian street food as tapas. If you’d like a side of history with your meal, be sure to make a reservation at Restaurante Sobrino de Botín, a nearly 300-years-old Madrid restaurant and one of the world’s oldest eatery. Try delicious dishes like roasted lamb and suckling pig while marveling at the restaurant’s retro surroundings. And being the international city it is, there are also plenty of restaurants in Madrid that specialize in non-Spanish cuisine. Grab a table at Bangkok Thai for a taste of the Far East or dip into the Paella de la Reina for rich Mediterranean cuisine. And whatever you choose, be sure to eat to your heart’s content in this hotbed of top notch cuisine.

Located on a side street off the Gran Via, this small, intimate restaurant serves creative Spanish cuisine from chef-owner Juanjo López.

Located inside the Hesperia Madrid hotel, this Michelin two-starred restaurant was opened in 2001 by acclaimed Spanish chef Santi Santamaría.

A multilevel, multifunctional Philippe Starck–designed fun house—it’s really two restaurants, a basement dance club, and a throbbing scene around the black etched-glass bar.

Elegant wooden pillars and painted tiles divide the zinc-topped bar from the formal seated dining room at this Goya neighborhood restaurant. The signature cocido madrileño, a meat-and-chickpea stew served in three stages, also comes in a kids’ menu size.

Easily the swankiest dining option at the airport, El Madroño is set outside Terminal 4’s security area—so it’s the best place to have a pre-board meal with friends or business associates who aren’t traveling with you.

Batter-fried bacalao is crispest at Casa Revuelta, a tatty dive frozen in time off the stern, arcaded Plaza Mayor, the heart of Hapsburg Madrid.

A block away from Parque Retiro in the upscale Chamberí neighborhood, this corner Italian restaurant is decorated in soft off-whites, Tuscan yellows, and photos of its celebrity diners. Bottles of dried, multicolored pastas hang on the walls.

Owned by self-taught chef and film historian Abraham García, this small Mediterranean restaurant is named after a 1961 Luis Buñuel movie.

On a quiet corner off one of La Latina’s busy tapas-hopping thoroughfares, Almendro 13 is far from undiscovered—in fact, it buzzes. But that’s part of its allure.

This posh Peruvian import may make ceviche the new sushi. Lima-based celebrity kitchen warrior Gastón Acurio, who already presides over a formidable Latin American restaurant empire, is clearly aiming for maximum exposure.

Family-run spot popular with locals for its classic half-sandwich of grilled sardines topped with guindillo pepper ($2). The tart Bodegas Solagüen Crianza 2003 knifes through the oil and spice ($1.65).

Order featherlight tempura of baby vegetables highlighted with a sweet-tart reduction of sherry vinegar.

Tucked away on a narrow street in the Lavapiés neighborhood, this tiny restaurant serves Mediterranean cuisine inspired by the Spanish coast and countryside.

In 1974, restaurateur Lucio Blásquez opened this eponymous two-story restaurant specializing in Castilian cuisine prepared in a coal-fired oven, and it’s been a Madrid mainstay ever since.

This no-frills taberna in the Chamberí district is the unofficial clubhouse for the capital’s food and art crowds, and chef, journalist, and TV personality Alberto Fernández Bombín is your ultimate hipster host.