Madrid

Restaurants in Madrid

First opened in 1894, Chocolatería San Ginés is renowned for its churros con chocolate — deep fried pastries served with a cup of thick dipping chocolate.

Chef César Rodríguez, who trained at Abraham García’s Viridiana restaurant, now heads this market-driven eatery located on a tree-lined street in the Argüelles district.

This is tapas for grown-ups who like to sit down—if they can get a seat (reservations are a must). A huge bar takes up much of the main dining room, and tables are in high demand.

Rub elbows with art-world insiders in an interior designed by Pascua Ortega. Try the tuna tartare with chive-flecked guacamole.

The establishment’s sole victual—a two-inch-high stack of mushrooms precariously united by a toothpick and topped with a tiny shrimp ($1.50)—pairs perfectly with Bodegas Lan Crianza 2004. It’s a classic Rioja that impresses with elegance, not fruit ($1.90).

Neither folksy nor funky nor fashionable, this brightly bourgeois bar swathed in polished wood is attached to the restaurant inside the Santiago _Bernabéu stadium, home to the Real Madrid soccer team.

Located in the basement of the Hotel Miguel Angel, La Broche opened in 2000 under star chef Sergi Arola (a disciple of Ferran Adrià). Arola has since moved on, but his one-time student Angel Palacios now heads the Michelin-starred restaurant.

Sherries drawn straight from barrels are accompanied by Andalusian olives and nuts roasted in a wood-burning oven.

Madrid’s gastronomic god Sergi Arola opened this low-key long, earth-toned space that seems oddly sedate for a rocker turned chef.

Savor the decadent canapé of whipped blue cheese and cured-duck ham at La Castela, which still generously honors the ritual of serving a free nibble with each new drink order.

Owned by former TV chef Darío Barrio, this trendy Salamanca restaurant is set in a 19th-century coalbunker renovated by Barrio’s architect brothers. Inside the unmarked building, a staircase leads down to a cellar of whitewashed brick walls, tall archways, and cool-tone lighting.

A large selection of Iberian wines by the glass—along with tapas, charcuterie plates, pâtés, and canapés—soothe flight-frazzled nerves at this sleek wine bar.

This gem in the arsenal of every businessman and artist in town is nevertheless missed by many tourists. Inside the modern, uncluttered Scandinavian-style dining room, walls alternate between bold red, mustard yellow, and carved blond-wood panels.