Madrid

Restaurants in Madrid

Unsurprisingly, Madrid is one of the tapas capitals of the world, and dozens of Madrid restaurants serve the dishes. If you want some of the best the city has to offer, visit eateries like El Tempranillo, located near the Plaza de los Carros on the lively Calle Cava Baja, or the super romantic Celso y Manolo, which specializes in Madrilenian street food as tapas. If you’d like a side of history with your meal, be sure to make a reservation at Restaurante Sobrino de Botín, a nearly 300-years-old Madrid restaurant and one of the world’s oldest eatery. Try delicious dishes like roasted lamb and suckling pig while marveling at the restaurant’s retro surroundings. And being the international city it is, there are also plenty of restaurants in Madrid that specialize in non-Spanish cuisine. Grab a table at Bangkok Thai for a taste of the Far East or dip into the Paella de la Reina for rich Mediterranean cuisine. And whatever you choose, be sure to eat to your heart’s content in this hotbed of top notch cuisine.

Located just off the Gran Via, this casual, inexpensive eatery is set on a busy corner in Chueca, the city’s gay village. The two-story dining room is open and airy, with large street-level windows, whitewashed walls, bare-board floors, and pale gray chairs.

Star chef Andrés Madrigal is at the top of his game creating nouveau-Spanish dishes for his 75-euro tasting menu (about $96; à la carte is also available), which starts with a series of amuse-bouches, such as a Bloody Mary with Parmesan foam served in a shot glass.

This starkly handsome gray-stone–and–dark-wood shrine to raw fish is locted in the plush Hotel Wellington.

This Philippe Starck-designed madrileño favorite serves a delicious Wagyu-beef carpaccio.

Located on a quiet side street just north of the Teatro Real (Royal Theatre), this family-owned tavern is renowned for its signature cocido madrileño (Madrilenian stew), a house specialty since the restaurant opened in 1870.

The taberna stocks the latest emerging vintages (try wines from the Madrid region).

This Salamanca's Recoletos neighborhood restaurant debuted in 2004, serving Asturian (Northern Spanish) cuisine, stews, and fresh seafood. Unusual dishes by chef Sandro Silva include grilled sea urchin in its own shell and oxtail meatballs.

Akin to (but a bit more polished than) the Sbarro chain found in many American airports, this cafeteria-style eatery serves up Italian fast-food staples: pizza by the slice with a variety of toppings, red-sauce pastas like lasagna and baked ziti. Grab and go or sit and stay—it’s your choice.

This is tapas for grown-ups who like to sit down—if they can get a seat (reservations are a must). A huge bar takes up much of the main dining room, and tables are in high demand.

First opened in 1894, Chocolatería San Ginés is renowned for its churros con chocolate — deep fried pastries served with a cup of thick dipping chocolate.

Chef César Rodríguez, who trained at Abraham García’s Viridiana restaurant, now heads this market-driven eatery located on a tree-lined street in the Argüelles district.

Rub elbows with art-world insiders in an interior designed by Pascua Ortega. Try the tuna tartare with chive-flecked guacamole.

The establishment’s sole victual—a two-inch-high stack of mushrooms precariously united by a toothpick and topped with a tiny shrimp ($1.50)—pairs perfectly with Bodegas Lan Crianza 2004. It’s a classic Rioja that impresses with elegance, not fruit ($1.90).

Neither folksy nor funky nor fashionable, this brightly bourgeois bar swathed in polished wood is attached to the restaurant inside the Santiago _Bernabéu stadium, home to the Real Madrid soccer team.