Madrid

Restaurants in Madrid

Order the saucy albóndigas with a glass of vermú de (vermouth on tap) slid across the antique onyx counter at Casa Alberto, in a building where Cervantes once wrote.

The mini-hamburguesas with caramelized onions are some of the best burgers in the world.

The lunch spot has a real Valencian making the paella.

Lhardy is a grand 19th-century museum piece famous for its burnished interiors and cocido (boiled dinner).

A tiny corridor of a place where embuchados, plates of grilled goat tripe, sizzling and crunchy, with spicy romesco sauce ($6.40) are served with Bodegas Solana de Ramírez Ruíz Valsarte Crianza 2002. The wine is full of sweetness and round in the mouth ($1.80).

Often named among the best seafood restaurant in Spain, O’Pazo is owned by Evaristo Garcia, who also runs Pescaderías Coruñesas, a seafood supplier that provides the restaurant with fresh fish from the Galician coast.

Known for its market-sourced Mediterranean cuisine, Chantarella is headed by chef-brothers Álvaro and Enrique Díaz. The brothers opened the restaurant on Calle Luisa Fernanda in 1999 and moved to this larger space after two years.

The current insider favorite among Madrid’s food and wine elite, Senzone, at the new Hospes hotel in Barrio de Salamanca, brings together the unique talents of 27-year-old chef Francisco Morales—a protégé of avant-garde guru Andoni Aduriz, of San Sebastián’s Mugaritz—and his wife, Rut Cotroneo, t

It may not look like much, but Cisne Azul, steps from Plaza de Chueca, is a mecca for all sorts of exotic mushrooms (to eat, that is).

Offers some two dozen sparkling wines by the glass-just right with the fines de claire oysters from bivalve and caviar purveyor Daniel Sorlut (#67).

Gambas al ajillo (garlic shrimp) has been a specialty at the tiled taberna for some 100 years.

Asiana is one of Madrid's most exciting discoveries. Ring the bell and you'll be whisked down to one of seven candlelit tables in a subterranean space crammed with Ming vases and gilded Buddhas.