Restaurants in Madrid

All cool brushed steel, slatted wood, and black slate, Sula is such a white-hot celebrity hangout one can forget that the joint is actually owned by Joselito (the brand behind the world’s greatest ibérico ham) and Quique Dacosta, the young molecular-gastronomy genius of Michelin two-starred El Po

In 1974, restaurateur Lucio Blásquez opened this eponymous two-story restaurant specializing in Castilian cuisine prepared in a coal-fired oven, and it’s been a Madrid mainstay ever since.

This no-frills taberna in the Chamberí district is the unofficial clubhouse for the capital’s food and art crowds, and chef, journalist, and TV personality Alberto Fernández Bombín is your ultimate hipster host.

The taberna offers a warm salad of partridge and bitter greens scattered with pomegranate seeds.

Located inside the stylish Hotel Urban, the 45-seat dining room at Europa Decó combines Art Deco—style design (including a gilt chimney) with international touches like Papua New Guinean totems, Zimbabwean leather furniture, and Brazilian granite floors.

This self-serve restaurant styles itself after Madrid’s historic central square, with wrought-iron lampposts, marble-topped dining tables, and etched-glass vintagey-looking signs. The fare includes traditional Spanish dishes, such as paella, bean stew, and veal brochette.

Located just off the Gran Via, this casual, inexpensive eatery is set on a busy corner in Chueca, the city’s gay village. The two-story dining room is open and airy, with large street-level windows, whitewashed walls, bare-board floors, and pale gray chairs.

Star chef Andrés Madrigal is at the top of his game creating nouveau-Spanish dishes for his 75-euro tasting menu (about $96; à la carte is also available), which starts with a series of amuse-bouches, such as a Bloody Mary with Parmesan foam served in a shot glass.

This starkly handsome gray-stone–and–dark-wood shrine to raw fish is locted in the plush Hotel Wellington.

This Philippe Starck-designed madrileño favorite serves a delicious Wagyu-beef carpaccio.

Located on a quiet side street just north of the Teatro Real (Royal Theatre), this family-owned tavern is renowned for its signature cocido madrileño (Madrilenian stew), a house specialty since the restaurant opened in 1870.

The taberna stocks the latest emerging vintages (try wines from the Madrid region).

This Salamanca's Recoletos neighborhood restaurant debuted in 2004, serving Asturian (Northern Spanish) cuisine, stews, and fresh seafood. Unusual dishes by chef Sandro Silva include grilled sea urchin in its own shell and oxtail meatballs.

Akin to (but a bit more polished than) the Sbarro chain found in many American airports, this cafeteria-style eatery serves up Italian fast-food staples: pizza by the slice with a variety of toppings, red-sauce pastas like lasagna and baked ziti. Grab and go or sit and stay—it’s your choice.