Madrid

Restaurants in Madrid

Lhardy is a grand 19th-century museum piece famous for its burnished interiors and cocido (boiled dinner).

A tiny corridor of a place where embuchados, plates of grilled goat tripe, sizzling and crunchy, with spicy romesco sauce ($6.40) are served with Bodegas Solana de Ramírez Ruíz Valsarte Crianza 2002. The wine is full of sweetness and round in the mouth ($1.80).

Often named among the best seafood restaurant in Spain, O’Pazo is owned by Evaristo Garcia, who also runs Pescaderías Coruñesas, a seafood supplier that provides the restaurant with fresh fish from the Galician coast.

Known for its market-sourced Mediterranean cuisine, Chantarella is headed by chef-brothers Álvaro and Enrique Díaz. The brothers opened the restaurant on Calle Luisa Fernanda in 1999 and moved to this larger space after two years.

The current insider favorite among Madrid’s food and wine elite, Senzone, at the new Hospes hotel in Barrio de Salamanca, brings together the unique talents of 27-year-old chef Francisco Morales—a protégé of avant-garde guru Andoni Aduriz, of San Sebastián’s Mugaritz—and his wife, Rut Cotroneo, t

It may not look like much, but Cisne Azul, steps from Plaza de Chueca, is a mecca for all sorts of exotic mushrooms (to eat, that is).

Offers some two dozen sparkling wines by the glass-just right with the fines de claire oysters from bivalve and caviar purveyor Daniel Sorlut (#67).

Gambas al ajillo (garlic shrimp) has been a specialty at the tiled taberna for some 100 years.

Asiana is one of Madrid's most exciting discoveries. Ring the bell and you'll be whisked down to one of seven candlelit tables in a subterranean space crammed with Ming vases and gilded Buddhas.

Grabbing a quick bite between flights doesn’t have to mean eating unhealthily. These cafés offer fresh-made salads, sandwiches, and juices, which you can either enjoy in the glassed-in modern dining areas, or pack to take on board.  

Part restaurant and part nightclub, Arola Madrid is located in the Museo Reina Sofia (Queen Sofia Museum), which houses a renowned collection of 20th-century art, including Picasso’s Guernica.

Housed in a former dairy, La Vaquería de Suiza (The Swiss Dairy) smartly changed nothing about the original structure, with its unfinished cement floors and soaring 19th-century glass double doors, but added mismatched rough-hewn wood tables and chairs.

Located beside the art gallery Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza, Paradís serves Mediterranean seafood dishes and hosts themed culinary workshops about ingredients like local mushrooms, codfish, and calçots, a type of green onion.

Known more for its wine selection than its Mediterranean menu, this lunch-only bistro is located on the mezzanine of a Salamanca wine shop that stocks about 4,500 labels. Inside, the dining room’s pearl tones and dark wood contrast with the more casual high-tops and red chairs in the bar.

This smart urban grill house flanks the Santiago Bernabéu stadium with a sweeping view of the pitch.