Lower East Side

Things to do in Lower East Side

Installed at 134 Eldridge Street, near the boundary of Chinatown, a plain gray door with “134” and “M&H” in small stickers is the only indicator patrons will find that this hush-hush cocktail lounge exists.

105 Riv is inside the Hotel on Rivington, but also has an unmarked entrance down the street. Expect 105 Riv is inside the Hotel on Rivington, but also has an unmarked entrance down the street. Expect vintage 70’s interiors and impeccably made cocktails.

Searching for a place to house a museum honoring American immigrants, Ruth Abram unearthed 97 Orchard Street, a historic apartment building that was completed in 1863 and sheltered almost 7,000 immigrants over the years.

One of the best indie-rock music venues to emerge this millennium, Pianos opened quietly in 2002 in a former piano store—the club’s current owners didn’t bother to remove the sign—and since then has become an emerging band’s dream gig, thanks to the intimate setting and über-cool nabe.

This pocket-size Swedish outpost is the source for international labels like Veja, which makes organic canvas sneakers with Amazonian-rubber soles.

This chandelier-draped, Moulin Rouge-esque destination—a multihyphenated performance space-cum-cocktail lounge-cum-celebrity hangout-cum-restaurant—opened in late 2006.

Located below the street level, Wu Lim Qi Gong Master looks and feels like a musty, dim basement but has a cult-following of massage lovers. Wu Lim offers $21 half-hour massages of uncommon intensity (the Asian masseuses are scary strong, so don't expect a gentle back rub).

This striking home for downtown's contemporary art hub—led by savvy director Lisa Phillips—made a splashy debut in December 2007, thanks to its extraordinary lopsided, six-story building designed by Japanese duo Kazuyo Sejima and Ryue Nishizawa from acclaimed architectural firm SANAA.

Whimsy and beauty are openly celebrated at this irresistible home boutique. John Derien's entrancing East Village shop is packed floor to ceiling with one-of-a-kind finds.

Although it opened in 2004, walking into this custom tailor/barber/apothecary is like stepping into a 19th-century gentlemen's stockist.

Clean lines, streamlined forms, and the season's hot colors can be found among the designs of this Chilean-born couturier favored by Michelle Obama.

An airy, minimalist window-lined store that started as a Hamptons staple, it carries designers for men (Rag & Bone, Rogues Gallery) and women (Zac Posen, Jill Stuart), and attracts a wide array of buyers, including celebrities.

Fig

A 19th-century cabinet of curiosities, with European antiques and packable objets for the home, like a French nutcracker or a Syrian chess set.