Restaurants in Louisiana

Hailed as one of the "Top 20 Best New Restaurants in America" by Esquire magazine and boasting a head chef (Tenney Flynn) who was named New Orleans magazine's 2004 "Chef of the Year," GW Fins certainly comes with a pedigree.

This new eatery on Jackson Square in the French Quarter is local chef Scott Boswell's wake up call.

The menu at Café du Monde in the French Market is simple, and almost everyone comes for the same combination: café au lait and beignets. New Orleans-style cafe au lait is made with scalded milk, coffee and ground chicory root, creating a slightly bitter flavor.

This rustic bistro celebrates its storied Garden District location — a landmark dry goods shop — with 70-year’s-worth of worth of black and white photos.

Don’t let the modest, rustic appearance and off-the-beaten-path location of Domilise’s Po-Boy & Bar on Annuciation Street fool you. The food here is well-worth a sidetrack. Once inside you’ll find simple tables and wood-paneled walls, and possibly a line.

Opened in 2001 by James Beard Award-winner and New Orleans native John Besh, August has become a fine dining favorite in the Central Business District.

This Australian-themed dive bar may seem out of place in New Orleans’s Central Business District, but the pub has a loyal following of locals thanks to its laid-back atmosphere and affordable, no-frills menu.

Parlez vous francais? Chef Aaron Burgau’s menu at Patois certainly does, but with a strong southern twang. Considering his commitment to locally sourced ingredients, how could it not?

At this fine-dining restaurant in the Windsor Court Hotel, crystal chandeliers and classic white tablecloths contrast with three colorful murals depicting scenes of life in Louisiana.

Gambian chefs celebrate the West African roots of New Orleans cuisine at this unassuming restaurant situated in a residential area of the French Quarter.

Set in a 200-year-old French Creole building, the Napoleon House was originally the residence of Mayor Nicholas Girod. In 1821, Girod offered the house to Napoleon Bonaparte as a refuge during his exile.