Restaurants in Louisiana

Parlez vous francais? Chef Aaron Burgau’s menu at Patois certainly does, but with a strong southern twang. Considering his commitment to locally sourced ingredients, how could it not?

Proof that upscale Creole cuisine can be inventive, (relatively) affordable, and found outside of the French Quarter, Upperline is one of the most acclaimed eateries in the city.

At this fine-dining restaurant in the Windsor Court Hotel, crystal chandeliers and classic white tablecloths contrast with three colorful murals depicting scenes of life in Louisiana.

The roots of the Old Absinthe House date back to 1807, when the small building served as an importing business and, subsequently, a grocery store.

Step into the Bombay Club in the Prince Conti Hotel and you nearly expect to hear the murmur of British accents during the live music breaks. The interior’s rich hunter greens and handsome woodwork are complemented by artwork, leather wingback chairs, and candlelight.

The Bywater restaurant doubles as a gallery space for local artists and has a genuine bohemian charm.

With James Beard and Silver Spoon awards among his accolades, chef-owner John Besh set up his Franco-German brasserie Lüke in the city's Central Business District. Situated near the Hilton St.

Husband-and-wife team David and Torre Solazzo converted the boxy St. Tammany Parish court office into a Cal-Italian restaurant in 2002. The walls still retain their original brick, but chandelier lighting and blond-wood accents give the space a softer quality.

Celebrity chef, Susan Spicer's restaurant in Lakeview features an eclectic, globalized menu: a ceviche with fresh tortilla chips and guacamole; Thai shrimp and pork meatballs; pizza from a wood-burning oven; deviled eggs.

Brigsten’s restaurant is led by chef/co-owner Frank Brigtsen, who produces spicy, home-style Acadian/Creole dishes in a cozy, century-old cottage in Riverbend.