Louisiana

Restaurants in Louisiana

Serving up Cajun and Southern cuisine, Cochon on Tchoupitoulas Street is owned by James Beard award-winning chefs Donald Link and Stephen Strykewski. The spacious dining area boasts high ceilings, large windows, handmade modern wood-plank chairs and tables, and a bar made of etched steel.

Located steps from Bourbon Street in the south end the French Quarter, Arnaud’s has served classic Creole cuisine since 1918 in a restored turn-of-the-century house now run by the fourth generation of the Casbarian family.

The roots of the Old Absinthe House date back to 1807, when the small building served as an importing business and, subsequently, a grocery store.

Parkway Bakery and Tavern’s signature sandwich, the po’boy, is available in more than 20 varieties, including fried catfish, hot corned beef, and alligator sausage links. The surf and turf version is one of the most popular dishes.

Husband-and-wife team David and Torre Solazzo converted the boxy St. Tammany Parish court office into a Cal-Italian restaurant in 2002. The walls still retain their original brick, but chandelier lighting and blond-wood accents give the space a softer quality.

Celebrity chef, Susan Spicer's restaurant in Lakeview features an eclectic, globalized menu: a ceviche with fresh tortilla chips and guacamole; Thai shrimp and pork meatballs; pizza from a wood-burning oven; deviled eggs.

Operating under the motto "Anyone can put the heat to the meat, but only a few can barbecue" since 1983, A & R is perhaps the pinnacle of BBQ in Memphis.

The light-gray siding and sconce-lit green front door make Café Minh look more like a house than a Canal Street restauranteven the interior has the low-key comfort of white-clothed tables boasting fresh flowers, beneath soft lighting from the high ceilings.

Harrah's flamboyant downtown casino plays host to this 150-seat steakhouse located just off the casino floor. Vacationing retirees dine alongside jetsetters and hipsters in a modern space favoring rich leathers and azure hues against the bold colors of George Rodrigue’s Blue Dog.

A small round sign advertising warm beer, lousy food, and poor service marks the location of this lively uptown eatery.

Stately French

Rio Mar, “where the river meets the sea,” is the restaurant of award-winning chef Adolfo Garcia, who fuses his Spanish and Latin American roots into a seafood-based menu.

Port of Call represents the best of classic "divey" eating in New Orleans. Situated centrally in the French Quarter, this burger joint-steakhouse combo is the perfect place to refuel during a night of Bourbon Street bar-hopping.