Restaurants in Louisiana

Resembling the streetcars that pass by outside on St. Charles Avenue, this long, narrow bistro is a popular choice for dates and late night dining. Behind a glass façade strung with miniature lights, the interior is adorned with a candlelit bar and plush red booths.

Serving traditional French-Creole fare in the Quarter since 1840, Antoine’s is the country’s oldest family-run restaurant.

Serving up Cajun and Southern cuisine, Cochon on Tchoupitoulas Street is owned by James Beard award-winning chefs Donald Link and Stephen Strykewski. The spacious dining area boasts high ceilings, large windows, handmade modern wood-plank chairs and tables, and a bar made of etched steel.

Located steps from Bourbon Street in the south end the French Quarter, Arnaud’s has served classic Creole cuisine since 1918 in a restored turn-of-the-century house now run by the fourth generation of the Casbarian family.

Parlez vous francais? Chef Aaron Burgau’s menu at Patois certainly does, but with a strong southern twang. Considering his commitment to locally sourced ingredients, how could it not?

Proof that upscale Creole cuisine can be inventive, (relatively) affordable, and found outside of the French Quarter, Upperline is one of the most acclaimed eateries in the city.

At this fine-dining restaurant in the Windsor Court Hotel, crystal chandeliers and classic white tablecloths contrast with three colorful murals depicting scenes of life in Louisiana.

The roots of the Old Absinthe House date back to 1807, when the small building served as an importing business and, subsequently, a grocery store.

The Bywater restaurant doubles as a gallery space for local artists and has a genuine bohemian charm.

Step into the Bombay Club in the Prince Conti Hotel and you nearly expect to hear the murmur of British accents during the live music breaks. The interior’s rich hunter greens and handsome woodwork are complemented by artwork, leather wingback chairs, and candlelight.