Louisiana

Restaurants in Louisiana

Port of Call represents the best of classic "divey" eating in New Orleans. Situated centrally in the French Quarter, this burger joint-steakhouse combo is the perfect place to refuel during a night of Bourbon Street bar-hopping.

It looks innocuous enough—picture windows; green walls cluttered with framed artifacts and photographs; paintings—all askance, and each checked tablecloth adorned with salt and pepper and the ubiquitous and addictive Crystal hot sauce.

Challenging you to celebrate your sweet tooth with touch of panache, this Garden District dessert boutique occupies a smart, clean-lined storefront right on Magazine Street.

Franky and Johnny's markets itself as a neighborhood restaurant in the Uptown district.

Set among trees in the residential Upper Garden District, Atchafalaya is well away from the French Quarter hulabaloo, which kind of makes it a destination restaurant (you'll need a car to get there).

Located in the Magazine Street antiques district, Lilette’s has been repeatedly named a top restaurant in New Orleans. Award-winning Chef John Harris, who apprenticed at restaurants with two Michelin stars in France, specializes in Contemporary American cuisine.

Brass-band jazz and BBQ joint

From the homemade sangria to the vibrant, come-as-you-are atmosphere, Lola's is everything a Spanish joint seated in New Orleans should be.

Husband and wife chef-owners Slade Rushing and Allison Vines-Rushing combine the cuisines of Mississippi and Louisiana to create contemporary Southern cuisine with French touches at their Central Business District restaurant, MiLa. Fresh, local ingredients are a hallmark in such dishes as sweet t

In the heady mix that is New Orleans, Mimi’s celebrates the Gulf Coast sound and all the smoky, sweaty soul that comes with it.

Located on Decatur Street in the French Quarter, Central Grocery is an authnetic "only in 'Nawlins" type of place. This small, Italian-American grocery store has a history that reaches back to 1906, when it was founded by Salvatore Lupo, a Sicilian immigrant.

Named for the traditional Louisiana hog slaughtering celebration, Boucherie was established by Commander’s Palace and Stella alum Nathanial Zimet. Zimet first brought inventive fine dining to the masses with his purple food truck, Que Crawl, which eventually led to the creation of Boucherie.