Restaurants in Louisiana

A small round sign advertising warm beer, lousy food, and poor service marks the location of this lively uptown eatery.

Stately French

Don’t leave the neighborhood without swinging by this homey corner restaurant for fried chicken livers with pepper jelly or lacquered praline bacon, baked in brown sugar with crumbled pecans and tasting—if you can imagine it—like pig candy.

Hailed by Food and Wine as among the "best of the best," Executive Chef Susan Spicer has done wonders at Bayona.

Prominent amid the colorful and detailed architecture and ornate street lamps of the French Quarter is the global-modern restaurant Stella.

It looks innocuous enough—picture windows; green walls cluttered with framed artifacts and photographs; paintings—all askance, and each checked tablecloth adorned with salt and pepper and the ubiquitous and addictive Crystal hot sauce.

Parkway Bakery and Tavern’s signature sandwich, the po’boy, is available in more than 20 varieties, including fried catfish, hot corned beef, and alligator sausage links. The surf and turf version is one of the most popular dishes.

Port of Call represents the best of classic "divey" eating in New Orleans. Situated centrally in the French Quarter, this burger joint-steakhouse combo is the perfect place to refuel during a night of Bourbon Street bar-hopping.

Franky and Johnny's markets itself as a neighborhood restaurant in the Uptown district.

Set among trees in the residential Upper Garden District, Atchafalaya is well away from the French Quarter hulabaloo, which kind of makes it a destination restaurant (you'll need a car to get there).

Located in the Magazine Street antiques district, Lilette’s has been repeatedly named a top restaurant in New Orleans. Award-winning Chef John Harris, who apprenticed at restaurants with two Michelin stars in France, specializes in Contemporary American cuisine.

Brass-band jazz and BBQ joint