Louisiana

Restaurants in Louisiana

Prominent amid the colorful and detailed architecture and ornate street lamps of the French Quarter is the global-modern restaurant Stella.

Far from the usual tourist circuit, this uptown bistro serves reinvented Creole classics in a no-frills, two-story dining room. Open since 1983, Clancy’s has a loyal following of locals who enjoy the upscale yet still lively atmosphere.

This energetic café with high ceilings, bright sunlight, quiet nooks, and a staff of young hipsters is constantly filled by students from nearby universities, as well as longtime locals.

The debate over who serves the best po’ boy in New Orleans still rages, but one candidate lies just off the Jefferson Highway in the west end of the city.

Inspired by owner Nick Bazan’s heritage, this authentic Argentine steakhouse is locally renowned for its fine cuts of beef.

Located in the Bienville House Hotel, this French Quarter New American restaurant showcases the creative talents of Ian Schnoebelen, named a "Best New Chef in America" in 2007 by Food & Wine.

Hailed by Food and Wine as among the "best of the best," Executive Chef Susan Spicer has done wonders at Bayona.

Located in the Magazine Street antiques district, Lilette’s has been repeatedly named a top restaurant in New Orleans. Award-winning Chef John Harris, who apprenticed at restaurants with two Michelin stars in France, specializes in Contemporary American cuisine.

Brass-band jazz and BBQ joint

In the heady mix that is New Orleans, Mimi’s celebrates the Gulf Coast sound and all the smoky, sweaty soul that comes with it.

Located on Decatur Street in the French Quarter, Central Grocery is an authnetic "only in 'Nawlins" type of place. This small, Italian-American grocery store has a history that reaches back to 1906, when it was founded by Salvatore Lupo, a Sicilian immigrant.

Named for the traditional Louisiana hog slaughtering celebration, Boucherie was established by Commander’s Palace and Stella alum Nathanial Zimet. Zimet first brought inventive fine dining to the masses with his purple food truck, Que Crawl, which eventually led to the creation of Boucherie.

Don’t let the modest, rustic appearance and off-the-beaten-path location of Domilise’s Po-Boy & Bar on Annuciation Street fool you. The food here is well-worth a sidetrack. Once inside you’ll find simple tables and wood-paneled walls, and possibly a line.