Louisiana

Tips and Articles in Louisiana

Bed and breakfast. An elementary formula, right?It's amazing how wide a detour this concept has taken since farmwives started renting out the spare room to travelers. Of the 25,000-odd establishments around the country today, many deserve an A for...
Most New Orleans boutique hotels are hidden behind 19th-century façades and filled with precious antiques. The 18-room Loft 523, set amid high-rises in the city's Central Business District, feels more like an artists' lair in SoHo: hand-hammered c...
Lauren Hutton relives freshman year "I got my education on Bourbon Street, not at Sophie Newcomb," says model and adventuress Lauren Hutton recalling her first year at the two best-known New Orleans finishing schools. "I lived on Bourbon, baby, in...
1. Take tea (one of 108 varieties) at Alice's Tea Cup (102 W. 73rd St.; 212/799-3006). 2. Go for a whirl on a peppermint barstool at Dylan's Candy Bar (1011 Third Ave.; 646/735-0078), and sample some of the 5,000 sugar-coated treats from around...
There are two kinds of people in the world: those who are willing to go anywhere for something good to eat, and those whose last supper would consist of whatever's in the fridge. As a food critic, my job is to uncover the best kielbasa, the fluffi...
Seattle | New Orleans | Minneapolis | Philadelphia Seattle By Kimberly Brown Seely Long an industrial-strength zone of low-slung warehouses, truck yards, and miles of chain-link fence, SoDo (which stands for South of Downtown or South of the...
Opening this month at the New Orleans Museum of Art, "Jefferson's America & Napoleon's France" celebrates the bicentennial of the Louisiana Purchase and the cultural exchange that flourished between the two fragile republics 200 years ago. Through...
Although I've traveled to some delightful spots on this planet, my favorite destination remains the place where I grew up, New Orleans. In particular, there is one street I cherish, right at the nexus of the tourist town and my own private memorie...
I am not a bed-and-breakfast person, and I'm on the outs with inns. I don't like thumping my head against the eaves of quaint New England saltboxes, ripping Shaker quilts when I turn over in bed, or smiling politely as my innkeeper, who gave up Wa...
Less than 18 months after Hurricane Katrina, much of New Orleans is back and ready for visitors. Revamped favorites and interesting newcomers are contributing to the second act of one of America’s favorite cities. The Ritz-Carlton (921 Canal St.;...
Sustainable travel. Ecotourism. Fund-raising expeditions. Educational tours. Voluntourism. The lexicon of travel is expanding as quickly as the world is shrinking. For many, it is no longer enough to return home with a Turkish carpet or tales of...
Some things are exactly how you remember them. The entangled aromas of sweet jasmine and olive trees, cigars and creosote, chicory and burnt sugar and river mud. The air so soft you’re inclined to reach for a spoon. The Garden District mansions, w...
In an effort to curb traffic, cities across America are following San Francisco's lead and reinstating their cable car systems. Philadelphia's Girard Avenue trolley operated for a century before it came to a halt in 1992; now World War II-era cars...
• The family behind New Orleans' Commander's Palace restaurant began the New Orleans Hospitality Workers Disaster Relief Fund (www.ghcf.org) to benefit restaurant and hotel workers who lost their jobs. • Continental pledged tickets to any reg...
It's not always the four-star meals that stick in our memories when we travel. Sometimes the most evocative foods are simple, local dishes with everyday tastes. Look at a map of the United States: almost any port city you see could be marked by a ...