Los Angeles

Los Angeles Travel Guide

From the outside, the brick facade of The Bradbury Building—the oldest commercial building in the city center—looks fairly unremarkable, but walk inside and you’ll be rewarded by architectural treasures inspired by an 1880’s science fiction story and a Ouija board.

It’s now become a Southern California chainlet, but this original Kitson location was what started the phenomenon.

Since opening in 1957, this renowned live music club has helped launched the careers of some of rock’s most famous names, from Elton John and James Taylor to Guns N’ Roses and Metallica.

Formerly a private beachfront estate that William Randolph Hearst built for actress Marion Davies, the Annenberg Community Beach House is now open to the public as a place to enjoy the Santa Monica sand in style.

The shelves of this petite, independent book boutique are crammed to bursting with travel volumes covering every global destination imaginable, including an array of guidebooks along with travel literature from essay collections to poetry.

This historic neighborhood theatre offers one of the best movie-going experiences in town.

Insider favorite The Runway is an ideal spot for ladies to score some locally minded togs on a budget—they carry samples and overstock exclusively from L.A. designers at discounted prices.

The Paley Center is a repository of nearly 100 years of television and radio history that aims to examine the relationship between these art forms, as well as emerging media platforms, and society.

This atmospheric bar at the edge of the Venice Beach Boardwalk is one of the city’s oldest—it began as Menotti’s saloon in 1915 and wound up decades later as a dive bar catering to the likes of Jim Morrison. Today, under new ownership, Townhouse is reviving its vintage Prohibition-era allure.

A recent, next-door edition to Toscana (a celeb-beloved trattoria and neighborhood institution), Bar Toscana is a sleek, Milan-inspired lounge specializing in Italian cocktails and stuzzichini (small plates).

The Hotel Cafe is an anomaly along the Cahuenga Corridor cocktailing mecca: it’s a place where softly strummed guitars trump earsplitting dance beats and drinks are sipped, not pounded.

This museum dedicated to the history of recorded music brings the music-making process to life through a variety of interactive exhibits.

Silver Lake takes its name from this picturesque stash of water that glistens amid the neighborhood’s hilly slopes.