Los Angeles

Restaurants in Los Angeles

Look at all the fit people jogging along the beach and you’ll wonder how they stay so thin. After all, Los Angeles restaurants feature a dazzling mix of celebrity chefs, locavore bistros, classic diners, great taquerias and any other global cuisine you can imagine. Dine at some of the best restaurants in Los Angeles:

The A.O.C.’s name stands for Appellation d’Origine Contrôlée—the French system regulating the quality of local wines and cheeses—and this Los Angeles restaurant is a magnet for foodies and oenophiles. Highlights include pork rillettes served with pickled onions, and arroz negro with squid arrives with a big dollop of garlicky saffron aioli. Even if you don’t stay at the Fairmont Miramar Hotel and Bungalows in Santa Monica, its restaurant, Fig, is worth a stop for its renowned farm-to-table menu, with ingredients from the Santa Monica Farmers Market. It’s upscale but not stuffy: features include the charcuterie and cheese bar, and a taco bar at the Sunday brunch. If craft beer is a food group, check out Beer Belly, a gastropub in Koreatown, which also does great brats and ribs. You could eat round the clock in their neighborhood, which even has a few 24/7 restaurants such as Myung Dong Kyoja, known for its noodle soups, dumplings and kimchi.

AK

The restaurant is hidden beside a Crown Escrow outlet in a derelict mini-mall. Despite the lack of signage, the long, narrow room is jammed from noon to night with Silver Lake and Echo Park hipsters, each of them nursing an outsize bowl of Vietnam’s beloved, breathtakingly fragrant noodle soup.

Affable chef-owner Eric Greenspan is passionate about both food and music, which he brings together at his trendy yet intimate restaurant in the heart of the Melrose Avenue shopping district.

Cut

Wolfgang Puck opened CUT in 2006 inside the Beverly Wilshire hotel. Architect Richard Meier, who designed the Getty Center, crafted the bright, white-walled space, which includes tiered seating, a glass-front kitchen, and floor-to-ceiling windows.

Located on the north end of Malibu, this casual seafood market and café is popular with surfers and sunbathers. Mark Ridgeway and his partners first sold seafood on the Malibu Pier, then moved up the coast, shielding their oceanic operation with four walls.

Harold Lloyd’s former West Hollywood carriage house now belongs to chef Suzanne Goin and sommelier Caroline Styne. A Spanish tiled roof protects the brick-walled dining room and patio, which the duo punctuates with plants.

Opened by the late Susan Campoy in 1985, San Marino café has since expanded in size and scope with the help of her daughters. The restaurant boasts vine-covered arches, a spacious covered patio, and a market with well-stocked shelves and display cases.

Fourth-generation islander Steve Bray opened this seafood and steak restaurant, just steps from the pier, in 2001. The upstairs dining room has panoramic views of Avalon Harbor from the arched bay windows.

The name of this rustic restaurant and bar in the Lake Arrowhead Resort and Spa refers to its location along U.S. Highway 189. The bar has a sliced timber base and moose antler chandeliers. The adjacent dining room has white tablecloths and built-in wooden wine racks.

New American hangout