Los Angeles

Restaurants in Los Angeles

Look at all the fit people jogging along the beach and you’ll wonder how they stay so thin. After all, Los Angeles restaurants feature a dazzling mix of celebrity chefs, locavore bistros, classic diners, great taquerias and any other global cuisine you can imagine. Dine at some of the best restaurants in Los Angeles:

The A.O.C.’s name stands for Appellation d’Origine Contrôlée—the French system regulating the quality of local wines and cheeses—and this Los Angeles restaurant is a magnet for foodies and oenophiles. Highlights include pork rillettes served with pickled onions, and arroz negro with squid arrives with a big dollop of garlicky saffron aioli. Even if you don’t stay at the Fairmont Miramar Hotel and Bungalows in Santa Monica, its restaurant, Fig, is worth a stop for its renowned farm-to-table menu, with ingredients from the Santa Monica Farmers Market. It’s upscale but not stuffy: features include the charcuterie and cheese bar, and a taco bar at the Sunday brunch. If craft beer is a food group, check out Beer Belly, a gastropub in Koreatown, which also does great brats and ribs. You could eat round the clock in their neighborhood, which even has a few 24/7 restaurants such as Myung Dong Kyoja, known for its noodle soups, dumplings and kimchi.

The largest fast food chain in Latin America, Pollo Campero (meaning “country chicken”) was first founded in Guatemala in 1971. Then, in 2002, the franchise expanded to the United States, beginning with this flagship location in downtown L.A.

Japanese tapas and sushi scene

Suzanne Goin’s breezy 2010-opened restaurant-café-food shop in Brentwood is precisely the sort of place where unadventurous diners order salads as a main course.

Simon L.A., located inside the Sofitel Los Angeles, is the creation of Chef Kerry Simon, known as the “Rock and Roll Chef.” Simon, who has garnered a celebrity his “wild food,” honed his culinary skills in such renowned establishments as the Plaza in New York City.

Bar Lubitsch is a covert-feeling bar decorated in shades of red and gold, and further outfitted with crystal chandeliers hanging from the ceiling. The walls are covered with propaganda posters, lending an air of secrecy to this Russian-themed venue.

Since 1997, this Monica Blvd restaurant has been bringing contemporary Italian cuisine to West LA diners. Redesigned by Osvaldo Maiozzi in 2005, the interior now features apricot-colored leather booths, imported chandeliers and sconces, and an art deco ceiling fixture made from Italian stucco.

At this West Hollywood Japanese restaurant, trendy patrons settle into an equally trendy, 6,000-sq-ft dining room that features large arched windows, bar tops in 400-year-old redwood, and walls lined with protruding railroad spikes.

Enjoy the New American cuisine—spicy Louisiana crab cakes, homemade butterscotch sundaes—in the intimate, folksy dining room of this Los Angeles institution, or in its walled outdoor patio covered with climbing roses.

Pick up picnic provisions like gourmet sandwiches and vegan potato salad.

A well-known food vendor, the roving Kogi food trucks serve Korean and Mexican fusion cuisine. The brainchild of Korean-American chef Roy Choi, Kogi sells such items as tacos filled with everything from tofu to Korean barbecued short ribs, kimichi quesadillas, and the Pacman Burger made

At this retro diner-meets-coffee shop near the Hollywood Palladium, the menu (as the name suggests) focuses mainly on one item: waffles. Owner Scooter Kanfer-Cartmill puts a modern spin on this breakfast staple by using fresh, artisanal ingredients – no imitation maple syrup here.

This West Hollywood Mexican joint is modeled after a colonial Spanish Hacienda. The Spanish Kitchen has Tecate tile, antique wood doors, and period ironworks all transported north from the old country, as well as a fireplace-lit patio.