Los Angeles

Restaurants in Los Angeles

Look at all the fit people jogging along the beach and you’ll wonder how they stay so thin. After all, Los Angeles restaurants feature a dazzling mix of celebrity chefs, locavore bistros, classic diners, great taquerias and any other global cuisine you can imagine. Dine at some of the best restaurants in Los Angeles:

The A.O.C.’s name stands for Appellation d’Origine Contrôlée—the French system regulating the quality of local wines and cheeses—and this Los Angeles restaurant is a magnet for foodies and oenophiles. Highlights include pork rillettes served with pickled onions, and arroz negro with squid arrives with a big dollop of garlicky saffron aioli. Even if you don’t stay at the Fairmont Miramar Hotel and Bungalows in Santa Monica, its restaurant, Fig, is worth a stop for its renowned farm-to-table menu, with ingredients from the Santa Monica Farmers Market. It’s upscale but not stuffy: features include the charcuterie and cheese bar, and a taco bar at the Sunday brunch. If craft beer is a food group, check out Beer Belly, a gastropub in Koreatown, which also does great brats and ribs. You could eat round the clock in their neighborhood, which even has a few 24/7 restaurants such as Myung Dong Kyoja, known for its noodle soups, dumplings and kimchi.

Minimalist décor and maxi-prices mark this West-LA sushi spot featuring traditional Japanese cuisine with California influences. Unassuming in its location if not in price, Mori Sushi occupies an industrial gray building on a dodgy stretch of Pico Blvd.

Brews and brauts are the main attraction at this downtown version of a German biergarten. Wurstküche’s brauts range from traditional Kielbasas to exotic specialty sausages, such as an alligator and pork combination, rattlesnake and rabbit mix, and duck and bacon option.

First founded in 1995 as a catering company, Joan’s on Third is now one of the most popular eateries in Mid-City West. Part café and part gourmet market, Joan’s welcomes visitors with two cow statues beside a row of always-bustling sidewalk tables.

Located in a hipster Venice neighborhood, Flake’s entrance is marked with a wood surfboard propped against the wall. Customers at the small place can sit at an outdoor table or indoors, with light wood and green banquette seating and white walls trimmed in orange.

Angelenos have many options for Thai food—some of the best in the country, in fact—but significantly less so after 2am.

High-end comfort food is what you’ll find at this Wilshire Blvd eatery that reopened in 2009 in a more laid-back incarnation.

Located in the Beverly Hills Hotel, this bar and restaurant remains a destination for entertainment-industry folks and tourists decades after its founding. The interior is tropical plush, down to the banana leaf wallpaper, fresh flower arrangements, live piano music, and deep booths.

Wild seafood in its "purest and simplest form" is the guiding passion behind Executive Chef Michael Comarusti’s Providence, LA. Combining East coast tradition with "West Coast eccentricity," the fine-dining establishment is home to some of the best-reviewed seafood on the West coast.

Glossy diner

John Rivera Sedlar, the Santa Fe–born chef who pioneered Southwestern cuisine two decades ago, makes his long-awaited return to the kitchen at Rivera.

In funky Silver Lake, this coffee shop offers a five-page menu of java drinks—all prepared in your choice of brewing device, from a siphon (which resembles a very elaborate bong) to a one-of-a-kind La Marzocco espresso machine sheathed in hand-pounded brass.

A Los Angeles landmark since 1921, this traditional steakhouse is located in a replica railway dining car adorned with overstuffed armchairs, plush banquettes, and white tablecloths.

"Surrealist chic" is the prevailing vibe at this bar and lounge located in Jose Andres’ innovative Bazaar complex. Ground zero for upscale hipsters and jet setters, Bar Centro features curtained nooks with area rugs and modern couches, as well as a central communal table.