Los Angeles

Restaurants in Los Angeles

Look at all the fit people jogging along the beach and you’ll wonder how they stay so thin. After all, Los Angeles restaurants feature a dazzling mix of celebrity chefs, locavore bistros, classic diners, great taquerias and any other global cuisine you can imagine. Dine at some of the best restaurants in Los Angeles:

The A.O.C.’s name stands for Appellation d’Origine Contrôlée—the French system regulating the quality of local wines and cheeses—and this Los Angeles restaurant is a magnet for foodies and oenophiles. Highlights include pork rillettes served with pickled onions, and arroz negro with squid arrives with a big dollop of garlicky saffron aioli. Even if you don’t stay at the Fairmont Miramar Hotel and Bungalows in Santa Monica, its restaurant, Fig, is worth a stop for its renowned farm-to-table menu, with ingredients from the Santa Monica Farmers Market. It’s upscale but not stuffy: features include the charcuterie and cheese bar, and a taco bar at the Sunday brunch. If craft beer is a food group, check out Beer Belly, a gastropub in Koreatown, which also does great brats and ribs. You could eat round the clock in their neighborhood, which even has a few 24/7 restaurants such as Myung Dong Kyoja, known for its noodle soups, dumplings and kimchi.

Just east of Old Pasadena, this locally inspired French bistro is housed in a restored Art Deco building dating from 1939. Classic jazz music plays in the dining rooms, which are furnished with hardwood floors, copper light fixtures, and small decorative mirrors.

The name, which stands for Appellation d’Origine Contrôlée (the French system regulating the quality of local wines and cheeses), clues foodies and oenophiles to this restaurant’s focus: wines, shareable small plates, and top-notch cheeses and charcuterie.

This long-standing Big Bear spot is known for its breakfast, which includes everything from egg-and-meat scrambles to waffles, even omelettes. Lunch and dinner are also served, with menus listing casual standards like burgers, wraps, and salads.

Funky Middle Eastern décor and all-you-can-eat Iranian fare distinguish this eatery in the heart of Westwood. Located in Rancho Park, Canary serves up exotic treats for the like donbalan (lightly breaded lamb testicles) and lamb tongue sandwiches.

In the area known as Little Persia or the Iranian restaurant row, Shamshiri Grill serves Mediterranean fare in a spacious dining room with black tables, orange floors, and red walls decorated by the works of local painters.

This "Grande Dame" of Chinatown is the go-to spot for Angelinos craving dim sum in the downtown area.

Located in the Miracle Mile district not far from the Page Museum, Luna Park serves mostly French and Italian food with American and Asian accents. Candles, dark woods, and thick curtains lend an intimate feel to this trendy spot.

Serving a contemporary take on French bistro cuisine, this eatery loccated inside a New-York-style loft space in east downtown.

It’s all about the cabra (goat) at this family-owned birriería in East LA, just five minutes from downtown. Established in 1972, the Mexican café does one thing: authentic birria, or slow-cooked goat stew. The simple dishes, sans rice and beans, are served in an equally no-frill

An unexpected perk along a lonely stretch of warehouses in Culver City, this bakery's shaded patio and turquoise window frames are reminiscent of a friendly café in Mexico.

Zeke’s highlights the best of American barbecue from major regions throughout the country: Carolina pulled pork, Texas beef brisket, Longhorn beef ribs, and Memphis baby back ribs.

A string of paper lanterns leads to the entrance of this upscale New American restaurant, housed in a small cottage dating from 1939.