Los Angeles

Restaurants in Los Angeles

Look at all the fit people jogging along the beach and you’ll wonder how they stay so thin. After all, Los Angeles restaurants feature a dazzling mix of celebrity chefs, locavore bistros, classic diners, great taquerias and any other global cuisine you can imagine. Dine at some of the best restaurants in Los Angeles:

The A.O.C.’s name stands for Appellation d’Origine Contrôlée—the French system regulating the quality of local wines and cheeses—and this Los Angeles restaurant is a magnet for foodies and oenophiles. Highlights include pork rillettes served with pickled onions, and arroz negro with squid arrives with a big dollop of garlicky saffron aioli. Even if you don’t stay at the Fairmont Miramar Hotel and Bungalows in Santa Monica, its restaurant, Fig, is worth a stop for its renowned farm-to-table menu, with ingredients from the Santa Monica Farmers Market. It’s upscale but not stuffy: features include the charcuterie and cheese bar, and a taco bar at the Sunday brunch. If craft beer is a food group, check out Beer Belly, a gastropub in Koreatown, which also does great brats and ribs. You could eat round the clock in their neighborhood, which even has a few 24/7 restaurants such as Myung Dong Kyoja, known for its noodle soups, dumplings and kimchi.

Located just across from Paramount Studios in Hollywood, Lucy’s El Adobe Café has its industry connections on conspicuous display: an entire wall features photos of celebrities who’ve dined there, from Jack Nicholson to George McGovern to Connie Chung.

The second of three branches, this traditional Mexican eatery opened in 2003 and is located on East Washington Boulevard in southeast LA.

Hollywood loves its sushi, especially when it comes in as glam a package as this Phillipe Starck-designed bar/resto.

Hans Rockenwagner brings 30 years of cooking experience in Germany, Switzerland, Chicago, and Los Angeles to this small café and bakery in Venice. Given his background, it’s no surprise that many of the items on the menu derive from Europe before he adds his American twists.

There’s a lot to like about a superior sushi joint disguised as a hole in wall and located next door to a 7-Eleven. As under the radar as LA sushi gets, this restaurant on Beverly is the genuine article.

One of Los Angeles' first gastropubs, this downtown Culver City spot serves a rotating American Regional menu in an interior of wood surfaces, polished concrete floors, and Asian rugs, as well as an outdoor patio.

A well-known food vendor, the roving Kogi food trucks serve Korean and Mexican fusion cuisine. The brainchild of Korean-American chef Roy Choi, Kogi sells such items as tacos filled with everything from tofu to Korean barbecued short ribs, kimichi quesadillas, and the Pacman Burger made

At this retro diner-meets-coffee shop near the Hollywood Palladium, the menu (as the name suggests) focuses mainly on one item: waffles. Owner Scooter Kanfer-Cartmill puts a modern spin on this breakfast staple by using fresh, artisanal ingredients – no imitation maple syrup here.

Bar Lubitsch is a covert-feeling bar decorated in shades of red and gold, and further outfitted with crystal chandeliers hanging from the ceiling. The walls are covered with propaganda posters, lending an air of secrecy to this Russian-themed venue.

Since 1997, this Monica Blvd restaurant has been bringing contemporary Italian cuisine to West LA diners. Redesigned by Osvaldo Maiozzi in 2005, the interior now features apricot-colored leather booths, imported chandeliers and sconces, and an art deco ceiling fixture made from Italian stucco.

At this West Hollywood Japanese restaurant, trendy patrons settle into an equally trendy, 6,000-sq-ft dining room that features large arched windows, bar tops in 400-year-old redwood, and walls lined with protruding railroad spikes.

Enjoy the New American cuisine—spicy Louisiana crab cakes, homemade butterscotch sundaes—in the intimate, folksy dining room of this Los Angeles institution, or in its walled outdoor patio covered with climbing roses.

Pick up picnic provisions like gourmet sandwiches and vegan potato salad.

It stands to reason that the same town that gave us In-N-Out Burger would deliver a wiener equivalent. Enter Pink's, whose franks are as worthy of a pre- or post-Oscar detour as that burger joint's.