Los Angeles

Restaurants in Los Angeles

Look at all the fit people jogging along the beach and you’ll wonder how they stay so thin. After all, Los Angeles restaurants feature a dazzling mix of celebrity chefs, locavore bistros, classic diners, great taquerias and any other global cuisine you can imagine. Dine at some of the best restaurants in Los Angeles:

The A.O.C.’s name stands for Appellation d’Origine Contrôlée—the French system regulating the quality of local wines and cheeses—and this Los Angeles restaurant is a magnet for foodies and oenophiles. Highlights include pork rillettes served with pickled onions, and arroz negro with squid arrives with a big dollop of garlicky saffron aioli. Even if you don’t stay at the Fairmont Miramar Hotel and Bungalows in Santa Monica, its restaurant, Fig, is worth a stop for its renowned farm-to-table menu, with ingredients from the Santa Monica Farmers Market. It’s upscale but not stuffy: features include the charcuterie and cheese bar, and a taco bar at the Sunday brunch. If craft beer is a food group, check out Beer Belly, a gastropub in Koreatown, which also does great brats and ribs. You could eat round the clock in their neighborhood, which even has a few 24/7 restaurants such as Myung Dong Kyoja, known for its noodle soups, dumplings and kimchi.

Located in the downtown Omni Los Angeles Hotel, Noé opened in 2003 and offers an ever-changing menu of Neo Bistro cuisine.

Locaated on La Cienega Boulevard’s Restaurant Row, this fusion concept was groundbreaking for Japanese-Peruvian cooking when Nobuyuki “Nobu” Matsuhisa opened it in 1987. The space contains a sushi bar and simple wooden tables.

XIV

Set in the Westfield Century City shopping mall, this bakery-meets-restaurant boasts a wood-paneled ceiling, sheer amoeba-like light fixtures, and tall glass partitions. Patrons also enjoy dining outside on the spacious patio, warmed by heaters during the winter.

It stands to reason that the same town that gave us In-N-Out Burger would deliver a wiener equivalent. Enter Pink's, whose franks are as worthy of a pre- or post-Oscar detour as that burger joint's.

This French bistro from chef-owner Raphael Lunetta opened in 1996, and stops just short of fine dining. The restaurant has brown awnings and arched windows outside, and inside, canary-yellow walls, ground-floor and mezzanine seating, and crystal chandeliers.

Koi

With its sultry, feng-shui-conscious design, flickering candlelight, and crowds of A-listers sipping sake martinis, Koi is perhaps better known for its glitzy scene than it is for its Japanese-inspired food.

This surf-themed establishment resides in far southern Long Beach, near the marina, along Alamitos Bay, and beyond a recessed entrance. Inside, Buster’s has blue floors and stools, wood tables, a central bar, and flat-screen TVs galore, though diners may prefer water views.

On Fridays, cockle-warming abgoost is the daily special: a bowl of hearty lamb, tomato, and bean soup accompanied by sprigs of tarragon and mint, raw onions and radish, warm barbari bread, and a tongue-tingling sour torshi (minced pickle).

For more than half a century, this old-school cafeteria has been serving hearty comfort foods inside a space with redwood forest décor. Clifford Clifton, who established the restaurant in 1935, was inspired by the Santa Cruz Mountains and a desire to bring cheer to Depression-weary downtown.

French-inspired dishes in an atmosphere of understated style mark this Melrose Avenue eatery fast becoming one of Southern California’s top restaurants.

This West Hollywood Mexican joint is modeled after a colonial Spanish Hacienda. The Spanish Kitchen has Tecate tile, antique wood doors, and period ironworks all transported north from the old country, as well as a fireplace-lit patio.