Los Angeles

Hotels in Los Angeles

Given the size and variety of the metro area itself, the hotels in Los Angeles reflect a huge amount of diversity, from mainstream business hotels to hip boutique properties and over-the-top luxury hotels. To spend less time driving around, choose your own hotel based on where you want to spend—say, along the coast if you want to explore beaches.

Beverly Hills Hotel is an icon and one of the best hotels in Los Angeles: the “Pink Palace” opened in 1912 and has 185 rooms, 23 bungalows and the celeb-magnet restaurant the Polo Lounge. The Beverly Wilshire is famous with some people for being the setting of Pretty Woman (even if the film was not actually shot here); this chandelier-accented Los Angeles hotel, in the heart of Beverly Hills, was built in the 1920s but is now run by Four Seasons. If any hotel in Los Angeles harbors the most secrets and escapades of the stars, it’s this castle-like Chateau Marmont on Sunset Boulevard, which has cottages, bungalows, suites and penthouses. If you want a plush and relaxing place to stay during a trip to Disneyland, it’s hard to beat the stately Grand Californian Hotel & Spa right in the Disneyland complex, with its own entrance to the California Adventure park.

Housed in a converted apartment building, this all-suites hotel is located on a quiet side street just off the Sunset Strip.

What sets the Bel-Air apart is its sense of sanctuary; despite the property’s relatively large size (12 acres), the warm staff, the cozy Spanish Mission-style architecture, and the old-world gestures like complimentary tea service in the lobby lounge create an intimate ambience.

Hip digs, reasonable prices, and a too-cool night scene are the draws at this André Balazs outpost.

Centrally located in downtown Avalon, and within walking distance of the beach, this upscale hotel is a mix of guest rooms and mini-suites, plus its two-bedroom Beach House. Accommodations in the VIP wing come with a water view and extras like whirlpool bathtubs and fireplaces.

Named one of the nation’s top seaside inns by Travel + Leisure, this quiet B&B is housed in a blue-shingled Colonial Revival building less than a block from Santa Monica Beach.

Gorgeously revived in 2006 by hotelier Jeff Klein, this 1929 Art Deco landmark was once an apartment building to the stars (John Wayne, Marilyn Monroe, and Frank Sinatra all had crash pads here).