Lisbon

Lisbon Travel Guide

As one of the first European countries to send ships into the unknown during the Age of Discovery, Portugal boasts a rich and storied history – a lot of which can still be seen on the streets of Lisbon. Between visiting the Belem Tower, Mosteiro dos Jeronimos and Castelo de Sao Jorge, there are so many things to do in Lisbon for history buffs.

Built over seven hills, Lisbon offers spectacular views to those who brave a hike to the top. The Elevador de Santa Justa rising above the streets of Baixa and the Mirardouro das Portas do Sol in Alfama are just two outposts where you can take in Lisbon’s breathtaking cityscape.

Still wondering what to do in Lisbon? Check out one of the city’s many museums. The Calouste Gulbenkian Museum houses work by Rembrandt and Monet, and a trip to see Warhol, Picasso and Dali in the Berardo Museum will cost you nothing.

Other things to do in Lisbon include listening to traditional Fado Museum, riding the historic Tram 28 and sampling traditional Portuguese custard pastries at Pasteis de Belem.

Promoter Manuel Reis's club at the docks is the place to go to dance to pumping house music all night long with a lively crowd of creative types and bar-crawlers.

The butter-soft lambskin and leather gloves rival anything you'll find in Paris, but at bargain prices.

The late Armenian oil tycoon's exhaustive collection, housed in a former estate, is considered by many to be the finest private art collection in the world, holding a vast range of works, including Egyptian, Greek, and Roman antiquities; medieval illuminated manuscripts; and Lalique jewelry and g

Ginjinha, the pungent morello-cherry liquor—a national icon—is best enjoyed at this venerable, peanut-size bar, near the National Theatre.

For a taste of the past, step into this shop that has been producing handmade beeswax candles in more or less the same fashion since 1789. There are tapers, novelty sculptures, and scented varieties.

This Art Nouveau jewelbox in the center of Chiado is the place for chocolates, fine coffee, and other gourmet treats.

The sound system is extra powerful and the crowd is scruffy-cute—intentionally so. Frequented by intellectuals and people from the arts, theater, and cinema.

Opened more than 20 years ago by Portuguese musician Luis Dams, the Xafarix nightclub in Santos continues to offer performances by local musicians.

Don’t let the seemingly shady surroundings deter you from an evening visit. The 1908 arms factory is home to a cultural center consisting of exposition rooms, a cinema, a bar and café, a bookstore, and a courtyard hosting concerts. The Saturday-at-midnight Fado is a must.

Here you can browse shelves lined with compulsory design reading or pick up vintage hand-carved cedar toy cars from TobeUs

Though you're unlikely to schlep home a Knoll chair, don't miss a trip to Manuel Reis's design-furniture boutique, a stone's throw from Bica do Sapato.

Fado, a melancholic style of acoustic Portuguese music dating back to the 1820's, is still an intricate part of the culture. It's mostly found at late-night clubs, but you can hear a sample and get a lesson in its history at this quirky museum.

Located in the Parque das Nações district along the Tagues River, the Pavilhao Atlantico serves as Lisbon's largest indoor arena and is easily accessible from the Gare do Oriente transportation hub.

Located next to the Jeronimos Monastery, the Belém Cultural Center (Fundação Centro Cultural de Belém, or CCB, to natives) comprises five main areas: the Conference, Performing Arts, and Exhibition Centers and the Educational and Formation Areas.

The Portuguese society set shops here for sensual but practical ready-to-wear suits and couture gowns designed by a two-man team that's on its way to becoming legendary.

Created by the editors of T+L for Regent Seven Seas Cruises