Lisbon Travel Guide

The sound system is extra powerful and the crowd is scruffy-cute—intentionally so. Frequented by intellectuals and people from the arts, theater, and cinema.

Opened more than 20 years ago by Portuguese musician Luis Dams, the Xafarix nightclub in Santos continues to offer performances by local musicians.

Don’t let the seemingly shady surroundings deter you from an evening visit. The 1908 arms factory is home to a cultural center consisting of exposition rooms, a cinema, a bar and café, a bookstore, and a courtyard hosting concerts. The Saturday-at-midnight Fado is a must.

Here you can browse shelves lined with compulsory design reading or pick up vintage hand-carved cedar toy cars from TobeUs

Though you're unlikely to schlep home a Knoll chair, don't miss a trip to Manuel Reis's design-furniture boutique, a stone's throw from Bica do Sapato.

Fado, a melancholic style of acoustic Portuguese music dating back to the 1820's, is still an intricate part of the culture. It's mostly found at late-night clubs, but you can hear a sample and get a lesson in its history at this quirky museum.

Located in the Parque das Nações district along the Tagues River, the Pavilhao Atlantico serves as Lisbon's largest indoor arena and is easily accessible from the Gare do Oriente transportation hub.

Located next to the Jeronimos Monastery, the Belém Cultural Center (Fundação Centro Cultural de Belém, or CCB, to natives) comprises five main areas: the Conference, Performing Arts, and Exhibition Centers and the Educational and Formation Areas.

The Portuguese society set shops here for sensual but practical ready-to-wear suits and couture gowns designed by a two-man team that's on its way to becoming legendary.

Created by the editors of T+L for Regent Seven Seas Cruises

Droves of locals make weekend-afternoon pilgrimages to the Parque das Nações, which was commissioned for Expo on what used to be a dingy industrial wasteland northeast of central Lisbon. Now it's a large garden adjoined by striking examples of contemporary architecture.

Snag one of the 18 wooden stools at this diminutive Bairro Alto boîte, where you can savor a singular Chardonnay from the emerging Alentejo region and be wowed by Barca Velha—a mythical Upper Douro red released only in exceptional years.

The Romanesque cathedral in the mazelike Alfama district houses 12th- and 13th-century treasures from a Moorish excavation. Be sure to stop at the adjoining cloister, which has an archaeological site with artifacts from Roman times.

Pasteis de Belém, the city’s famous custard tart, is sold in a lot of places, but the freshest come from this small confectionery near the Jerónimos monastery.

Score rare fragrances from Saboaria Confiança, Miller et Bertaux, and Absolument Absinthe, as well as ceramics by Flemish artist Piet Stockmans.


The shop's collection of well-priced vintage jewelry includes some excellent pieces from the forties and fifties.