Shopping in Lisbon

Alvaro Leiva

Shopping in Lisbon is a whole lot more interesting these days, with post-recession blues breeding a new crop of imaginative merchandise. From unearth... Read More

Shopping in Lisbon is a whole lot more interesting these days, with post-recession blues breeding a new crop of imaginative merchandise. From unearthed artistic azulejos (Portuguese decorative tiles) to a mountain-wool industry resurrected from the dead, contemporary Lisbon design is experiencing an inward-driven renaissance, resulting in a slew of new shopping surprises like A Vida Portuguesa, Loja do Burel, and Embaixaida, a one-stop shopping experience that’s quintessentially Portuguese.

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  • A Vida Portuguesa

    Catarina Portas' made-in-Portugal boutique is one-stop shopping for Portuguese design, including the coveted ceramic swallows made from Caldas da Rainha... Read More

  • Claus Porto

    Claus Porto's first Lisbon shop opened in 2016, giving the irresistible soaps and perfumes in eye-popping retro packaging from one of Portugal's oldest... Read More

  • Cork & Company

    Cork is abundant in Portugal, but from a design standpoint, things still have a long way to go. Cork & Company is the one exception to that rule... Read More

  • Cortiço & Neto

    This shop is a treasure trove of discontinued Portuguese industrial tiles, amassed by brothers Pedro, João, Ricardo, and Tiago Cortiço from their father... Read More

  • Embaxaida

    This Príncipe Real concept store embodies the new Lisbon, where derelict centuries-old palaces, mansions, and other underused historic buildings are... Read More

  • Fabrica Sant'Anna

    It's an impressive feat to stay in business since 1741, and this classic handmade azulejo (Portuguese decorative tile) dealer has done it by fiercely... Read More

  • House of Eleh

    One of the oldest women's shoemakers in the world, Eleh has been producing small batches of beautiful shoes with exceedingly rare handcraftsmanship... Read More

  • Loja do Burel

    This shop focuses on exquisite handbags, shoes, and homewares fashioned from burel—a Portuguese black wool ignored by all but the highland-dwelling... Read More

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