Lisbon

Restaurants in Lisbon

While most restaurants in Lisbon still serve traditional fare, a number of eateries have opened in recent years to cater to the capital’s international foodie clientele. Some of the best restaurants in Lisbon for the discerning food connoisseur include Alcantara Café, Kais and Restaurante Eleven.

When looking for an authentic Portuguese restaurant in Lisbon be sure to check for a handwritten description on a board as opposed to plastic menus with pictures of the dishes – which usually indicate a tourist trap. Most traditional restaurants charge for a small amount for bread, olives and cured meats or couvert placed on the table at the beginning of the meal. Ask the waiters to remove them if you do not wish to be charged.

Looking to rub shoulders with Lisbon’s hippest residents? Choose a restaurant in the Bica, Chiado and Santos neighborhoods. The Bairro Alto and Rua Nova do Carvalho are also good areas for great Lisbon restaurants.

Ibo

This restaurant on the water with views across the Tagus River, makes a nod to Mozambique—a former Portuguese colony—with piri-piri prawns and smoky Zambezi curries.

Os Ferreiras, in the city's center, is a fado mainstay, owned by singers Antonio and Maria Helena Ferreira (fado is a genre of Portuguese music). A rotating roster of fadistas, including Artur Batalha and Julia Lopes, perform every Friday and Saturday night after 10 p.m.

The restaurant features modern interiors (Saarinen chairs; graphic wallpaper) and whisper-thin carpaccios.

Housed in a brick, 19th-century cable car depot overlooking the Tagus River, the Kais restaurant has retained much of its warehouse style, with high ceilings, ironwork, and modern wooden tables, chairs, and curved black-top bars.

Head to this new spot for pan-Mediterranean fare, like linguine with local Serpa cheese and roasted walnuts.

The savory crêpes are generously sized, the hummus is house-made, and the jewelry in the clever wall-mounted cases is for sale.

Senhor Vinho, in Lapa, is owned by well-known fadista Maria da Fe; as such, it is an ideal restaurant for hearing Lisbon's unique fado music. The "Portuguese blues", popular since the 1820's, consists of mournful ballads about loss, painful love, and life's difficulties.

The restaurant, situated atop the Four Seasons Hotel Ritz—set above Parque Eduardo VII, offers some of the best views of the city.

Tucked away up the stairs from the Travessa Terreiro do Trigo and down the San Miguel alley is the restaurant Santo Antonio de Alfama.

Lisbon’s hippest restaurant—located at the docks and partly owned by actor John Malkovich—serves contemporary twists on Portuguese classics, such as codfish salad with chickpea ice cream. The retro-modern space is well suited to the forward-thinking food.

XL

Order a traditional Portuguese dinner of grilled fish with fresh vegetables.

A sleek space in the Amaliá Rodrigues garden of Parque and Michelin-starred chef Joachim Koerper’s ambitious Mediterranean menu cemented Eleven’s popularity from the moment it opened.

A Baiuca is tucked down the cobblestone Rua de Sao Miquel in Alfama. Bottles line the shelves, portraits of singers and vibrant, ceramic fish cover the tiled walls, and strings of light twinkle.