Lisbon

Hotels in Lisbon

From budget business oriented accommodation to opulent 5-star luxury, there are hotels in Lisbon to suit every traveler. While most travelers choose to stay in the heart of the city, Lisbon’s many eclectic neighborhoods each hold a unique charm for those wishing to further explore the city.

For easy access to the city’s best bars and Fado clubs, a hotel in the Bairro Alto is a good choice. For an arty feel, check out the accommodation in Chiado and Alfama, which are still conveniently close to the center of the city. Further out, some of the best hotels in Lisbon are located in the historic Belem region and near the Parque Eduardo VII.

Lisbon’s many boutique hotels offer guests luxurious surroundings with a more authentic feel than large international chains. Youth hostels and guesthouses are great price friendly alternatives to Lisbon hotels, which can get pricey during the peak season. Similarly, rental apartments offer travelers another alternative to hotels in Lisbon.

In Lisbon, old-world charms meet of-the-moment design, and the city’s Corinthia Hotel best captures these contrasting vibes. Built in 1983 and renovated twice (most recently in 2009), the spacious property now features jewel-toned interiors and a windowed façade.

The palazzo-style buildings of the Penha Longa Hotel and Golf resort overlook the lakes, forests, and mountains of Sintra. The monastery, built in 1355, now houses conference rooms and the 19th century palace with full-service spa treatment rooms and adorned with gazebos, waterfalls, and pools.

About one hour's drive from Lisbon is Obidos, a well-preserved, walled medieval town built in 1282 and known for its cobblestone streets and white-washed, blue-trimmed houses. The town's 11th-century castle was converted into Pousada do Castelo in the 1950's, the first of its kind.

Located between the shopping of Chiado and the nightlife and eateries of Bairro Alto, the Bairro Alto Hotel is housed in an ocher, 19th-century baroque building that overlooks the Luis de Camoes square.

Quietly tucked within the walls of the Castelo de Sao Jorge, the Solar do Castelo is housed in a lemon-yellow, 18th-century mansion done in the Pombaline style.

Located in a late 18th-century palace in bohemian Santos, the As Janelas Verdes hotel was home and inspiration to the Portuguese novelist Eca de Quieros.

Portuguese architect Francisco Aires Mateus renovated a 1907 iron factory to create this affordable hotel. Keeping its exterior intact, he gutted the building to make way for Zen-like interiors.

 Originally the 18th-century residence of the Dutch consul, the property opened as a hotel in the 1950’s. A Neoclassical building with frescoed rooms, gilded antiques, and famous guests (Catherine Deneuve; John Malkovich), the place had nevertheless seen better days.

The hotel has a bull’s-eye central location in the historic hub and compact but sweet rooms papered in metallic Fortuny designs.

Located in the quiet Lapa neighborhood, the York House hotel is a converted Carmelite convent built in 1606. The surrounding garden and terraces allow for relaxation but the National Museum of Ancient Art, the Rossio square, and the Castle of Sao Jorge are all nearby.

This Manuel Salgado–designed property combines 50 stylish, color-blocked rooms and suites with a prime riverfront setting and proximity to the Belém Cultural Center.

The history of Lisbon itself is present in Palacio Belmonte: it has walls built during the Roman and Muslim occupations and 59 azulejos panels from 1725, and the main building was built in 1449.

Traditionalists can book at this restored 18th-century town house with paned French doors and a subterranean pool and fitness center. It’s a 15-minute walk north from the central districts of Baixa and Alfama.

The NH Liberdade portends a hip new Lisbon, with its rooftop swimming pool, black-and-cream motif, and provocative details (like the faux- fur lamp in the lobby). The centrally located hotel gives guests the personal treatment, down to a choice of pillows (firm, soft, feather).