Lima

Things to do in Lima

History buffs wondering what to do in Lima will be happy to stumble upon the National Museum of Archaeology, Anthropology and History. This museum tells the history or Peru and its people.

For a few hours worth of fun, if you are wondering what to do in Lima, consider taking a trip up the Lima Hill. Since it is an arduous hill, your best option will be to take a tour bus or taxi up it. From the top, visitors can witness a panoramic view of the entire city and ocean.

Along with trendy bars and restaurants, you will find the Miraflores district has a very interesting seafront strip. This strip includes art sculptures, parks and incredible ocean and beach views. You may choose to amble along peacefully or rent a bike or rollerblades if you like a little bit of a faster pace.

One of the best things to do in Lima is head to Mercado Indio, a daily market that deals everything from traditional Peruvian clothing, silver jewelry, clay pots, and other locally made crafts. Be sure to bargain, it’s likely that you’ll be able to negotiate a great deal with many of the vendors within the market space.

Mario Testino’s sister, Giuliana, is one of the most talked-about designers in town. Pick up her hand-crocheted clothes. If you don’t like your dress hems short (and these are short), there are also plenty of delicate cardigans, shawls, and capes.

For a fascinating introduction to pre-Columbian life, visit this diminutive museum. The textiles are of particular note; the striped pieces have thread counts in the hundreds and could not be duplicated with modern techniques until recently. Open by appointment only, so call ahead.

Baroque, solemn, and imposing, a relic of the time when the Spaniards used the might of religious architecture to seduce the natives into becoming Catholic.

Peruvian-owned and -operated boutique firm offers trekking outings with access to Andean regions of Peru, Ecuador, and Bolivia. T+L Trip pick Lodge to Lodge Salkantay Trek to Machu Picchu. Follow the picturesque Salkantay Route to Machu Picchu and stay in luxury lodges.

Located in quiet Pueblo Libre, this museum is known for its unusual collection of erotic pottery, made more than 1,300 years ago.

A minor basilica and museum, this Lima Baroque church was inaugurated in 1672 and is best known for its large system of catacombs. Uncovered in 1943, the subterranean passageways contain hundreds of thousands of bones, some of which are arranged in elaborate geometric patterns.

Years as agent: 15. Specialties: Peru, Bolivia, Ecuador, Galápagos. Consultation fee: $250.

The pre-Columbian brick ruins can't compare with Machu Picchu and Cuzco, but the location—in the middle of a modern cityscape—has a surreal appeal.

Owner Mari Solari stocks her shop, which doubles as her residence, with handicrafts from around the country.

With a glass of wine in hand, watch the sun drop into the Pacific from one of four windowed rooms in this Victorian-style complex on a pier.

The store sells the Peruvian delicacy called teja, try the one made of candied lemons stuffed with dulce de leche and dipped in sugar.

Drop by the Brujas de Cachiche restaurant's bar for jazz, folk, and traditional dance performances. The cocktail menu, full of fruit-flavored variations on the pisco sour, takes the drink in daring directions with grape and passion-fruit versions.

Ester Ventura sells intriguing gold and silver jewelry that incorporates seeds, weavings, seashells, coral, and pre-Columbian fragments.