Las Vegas

Restaurants in Las Vegas

Bubble Bar, located in the Guy Savoy restaurant in Las Vegas’ Caesars Palace, offers diners a more affordable way to experience the innovative cuisine of award-winning French chef Guy Savoy.

Featuring some of the best views in Vegas, Mix is located on the 64th floor of THEhotel at Mandalay Bay and is lined with enormous wall-to-wall windows overlooking the Strip.

The restaurant at Loews Lake Las Vegas Resort, offers sushi, Kobe beef, and modern Asian specialties.

The first stateside restaurant from chef Pierre Gagnaire. Gagnaire’s cooking is quirky and cerebral, which doesn’t mean it can’t be fun.

A bit newer than Bacchanal, the Buffet at Aria has a bright, museum-cafeteria feel: cheery and easy to navigate.

Thanks to an airy, sky-lit atrium and Carmen Miranda-meets-Willy Wonka décor, Wynn Buffet could be the most lively and delightful buffet in Las Vegas. At least 16 live-action cooking stations make it a fun experience, plus the central dessert counter is a riot of color.

After a $17 million revamp two years ago, the Caesars buffet—now seating 600 people and appropriately named “Bacchanal”—serves more than 500 dishes from nine open kitchens. The opulent display puts to rest the concept of the mass offering; these dishes are cooked to order.

This “studio”-style buffet—lined with more than 100 screens—plays in-house cooking demos and Food Network programs while you graze, and prepares more than 200 items per day while you watch.

When it opened in 2010, The Cosmopolitan and its new buffet concept—dozens of individual and made-to-order dishes in adorable ramekins—launched the most recent era of buffet one-upmanship, sending casinos scrambling to reinvent their food halls (the culmination, so far, is the almost-too-massive

The Palms Casino Resort is known for its fantasy suites—two of the most extravagant, for instance, cost $40,000 each per night.

In-room dining at Nobu Hotel in Caesars Palace is not, in fact, priced that high compared with many other dining options on the Strip.

If regular old overpriced bottle service doesn’t impress you, plunk down a quarter million for the front-and-center table over the Fountains of Bellagio.

Think of “é” as a restaurant-within-a-restaurant. The eight-table space, carved from a private room adjacent to Jaleo, has only two seatings a night from Wednesday through Saturday, at 5:30 and 8:30 p.m.

Joël Robuchon, at the Mansion at MGM Grand, is the only restaurant in Vegas to boast three Michelin stars, and it doesn’t draw diners so much as it does pilgrims. They come to taste the $425, 16-course Degustation Menu.

If you love downtown bars like Commonwealth and Park, on Fremont—with great mixology and quirky environments—you’ll love this higher-end space for those nights when you feel like being on the Strip, but don’t feel like walking across a crowded gaming floor to get to the booze.