Key West

Things to do in Key West

It would be simple enough to come to this island getaway and eat conch fritters, drinks margaritas and check out the sunset every evening at Mallory Square—and have a great time doing just that. But to dig a little deeper into the magic and history of this place, where are some great things to do in Key West. Take a ferry ride first: The Yankee Freedom II takes visitors the 70 miles (about two hours) from Key West to Dry Tortugas National Park, then you’ll have about four hours to enjoy some of the best snorkeling in the world at Fort Jefferson and the Dry Tortugas beaches. (You can even camp here if you bring your own gear.)

One of the most classic things to do in Key West, Papa’s House, is always worth it. The official tours start every 10 minutes and are led by a ramshackle group of stand-up comics turned literature lovers. If you don't have a half-hour to spare, see the ancestors of his cats (bred to have extra toes, also known as polydactyly) and his sons' room, where photos of the author on his many vacations (Africa, Paris, Cuba) give new meaning to his literary works. Key West has attracted its fair share of vacationing presidents (Eisenhower, Kennedy and Carter among them), and the memorabilia displayed at Truman's former winter residence turned museum, the Little White House, immortalizes every presidential visit. The free two-room exhibit has photos and videos; for more, take a 45-minute tour of the president's personal quarters, furnished with his desk and custom-made poker table. One great option, if you’re wondering what to do in Key West with kids, is the 6,000-square-foot Florida Keys Eco-Discovery Center. You’ll learn about North America's only living contiguous barrier coral reef, and kids can get hand-son with a fun yellow submarine.

The famed shop produces a frozen version, dipped in chocolate and eaten from a stick, lolly-style.

The Mel Fisher Maritime Museum celebrates its namesake's 1985 discovery of the hull of a 1622 Spanish Galleon named Atocha, uncovered about a one-hour boat ride from Key West that divers and the Fishers still explore.

It's a shame to come to Hemingway's tropical hideaway and not take the official tour, which start every 10 minutes and are led by a ramshackle group of stand-up comics turned literature lovers.

The Yankee Freedom II takes visitors from Key West to Dry Tortugas National Park. The 70-mile excursion aboard this high-speed-catamaran takes a little more than two hours, and guests have about four hours to enjoy Fort Jefferson and the Dry Tortugas beaches.

The Museum of Art & History at the Custom House occupies a prime location on the port, but for Art Basel–quality work, head to this one-room gallery. The small collection of contemporary Cuban artists includes vibrant canvases by Luis Abreux and painted wooden folk carvings by Mario Sanchez.

Self-proclaimed environmental artist Nancy Forrester is the mastermind behind this oasis off Simonton Street. Like a patch of rainforest, it has dense foliage, squawking birds, and plenty of hidden nooks.

The National Marine Sanctuary–owned museum, devoted to the largest coral reef in North America, opened in January 2007; permanent exhibits highlight the Keys' 11 habitats, the living reef, and local weather patterns.

Don't miss the summer regattas held here.

Key West natives take their nightlife seriously, though not literally, as many begin their reveling at 3 p.m. Join the party early at this indoor-outdoor martini bar; three-man bands and solo guitarists serenade fortysomethings under a shimmering disco ball.

The museum dates to 1834.

A jazzy live band accompanies the rough-looking bartenders, who serve $3 brews to a wide range of characters beneath twinkling green lights.

The circa-1891 Key West Museum of Art & History at the Custom House features a dripping-with-malice portrait of Truman Capote, waving a 1976 American Bicentennial flag and pistol, a Vote for the Man sign and a bloody young couple in the foreground: it was done by Capote’s fellow all-star of w

Cuban cigars are embargoed in the United States, so buy a legal version at this warren-like shop directly across from Mallory Square.

At the improbably first-rate theater, local boy Richard Wilbur once helped out with Molière translations.

Pick up cartoonlike sculptures (fish in red high heels, anyone?) and bright beachscape-painted tables and chairs at this boutique filled with handmade crafts by Floridian artists. All evoke a cheery Key West sensibility.