Kennebunkport + The Southern Beaches

Kennebunkport + The Southern Beaches Travel Guide

Visitors to Ogunquit walk off their lobster roll consumption along the cliffs of Marginal Way, a paved path that wraps around rocky shores, along the margin of the land.

Some of the finest antiques for sale in the state of Maine emerge from this wisteria-covered 1685 mill house emporium, founded by Bob and Becky Jorgensen in the early 1970s.

The land of this 88-acre park was purchased by the federal government in 1872, eventually becoming a defense outpost for the Naval Shipyard in response to the Spanish-American War.

This family-owned bakery and diner is beloved for its doughnuts, which come in unusual flavors like butter crunch, maple crème, and powdered chocolate, in addition to more traditional choices. Baked goods are displayed inside large, wood-paneled cases behind the takeout counter.

Broadway veteran Walter Hartwig and wife Maude debuted their repertory theatre in 1937, and “America’s foremost summer theatre” continues to endure in southeast Maine.

Encompassing over 5,000 acres of salt marshes filled with migratory birds, maritime forests, and coastal dunes, the Rachel Carson National Wildlife Refuge was named in honor of the birder and naturalist who first brought many environmental issues to the forefront in the 1960s.

It’s easy to miss this nondescript gift and home and garden goods store on one of the busiest stretches of U.S. Route 1; inside, however, is a different story.

Home to more than 80 antique cars, this nonprofit museum appeals to auto enthusiasts and history buffs alike. Founded in 1946 by husband-and-wife team Glen and Judith Gould, the museum contains a wide variety of rare vehicles, including a number of vintage motorcycles.

This four-sailed schooner offers visitors the chance to take a ride on the wild side — of the Atlantic, that is. Cushioned cabin seating, a teak cockpit, and mahogany accents make for a comfortable sailing experience.

Come sunset, take a two-hour Atlantic excursion on the two-masted Pineapple Ketch, which sails daily from the Nonantum Resort.

Considered one of the most iconic images in Maine, the Cape Neddick Lighthouse (widely known as the Nubble Lighthouse) sits on a rocky outcropping about 100 yards off Long Sands Beach.

Harkening back to the early 1970’s, this old-fashioned arcade sits directly on Short Sands Beach in a white, corrugated metal building with big red letters spelling out its name.

A new design-forward boutique where you can buy supplies for a picnic at the beach—Sigg water bottles; plates, cups, and silverware cast by Scandinavian designer Joachim Nordwall; and a tote bag made of recycled boat sails to carry it all.