Kennebunkport + The Southern Beaches

Kennebunkport + The Southern Beaches Travel Guide

Come sunset, take a two-hour Atlantic excursion on the two-masted Pineapple Ketch, which sails daily from the Nonantum Resort.

Considered one of the most iconic images in Maine, the Cape Neddick Lighthouse (widely known as the Nubble Lighthouse) sits on a rocky outcropping about 100 yards off Long Sands Beach.

Harkening back to the early 1970’s, this old-fashioned arcade sits directly on Short Sands Beach in a white, corrugated metal building with big red letters spelling out its name.

A new design-forward boutique where you can buy supplies for a picnic at the beach—Sigg water bottles; plates, cups, and silverware cast by Scandinavian designer Joachim Nordwall; and a tote bag made of recycled boat sails to carry it all.

Ted Santarelli, John Amlaw, and Gerald Cunningham founded this museum in 1939 to celebrate the region’s rail-riding tradition.

Guests can experience a beloved New England tradition aboard Nick's Chance, a state-of-the-art whale-watching vessel that sails the Gulf of Maine daily. Finbacks, humpbacks, and minkes are just a few of the whale breeds that passengers may hope to glimpse.

Stop by the honky-tonk arcades and eat fried dough at this community beach.

Just half a mile north of the Nubble Lighthouse, Brown’s Ice Cream is a popular spot to cool off after a day of sightseeing.

A great place for a stroll, this quarter-mile stretch of Atlantic coastline bordering downtown York Beach is one of New England's top summertime destinations. Popular with vacationing families, Short Sands Beach combines scenic coastline views with easy access to York's amusements.

Located in southeast Maine, minutes from the New Hampshire border and just off the Maine Turnpike (i-95), this roadside stand on the Bluestar Memorial Highway is open from May 1 until the moment they sell out of Christmas trees (usually mid-Decmeber).

The brainchild of former NYC music industry execs and born-again Mainers Jessica Jenkins and Andy West, this smart three-story shop on Dock Square stocks eclectic gifts, guides, and gear, and souvenirs devoted to travel and the great outdoors.

Listed on the National Register of Historic Places, the Wells Reserve at Laudholm is a National Estuarine Research Reserve that protects 2,250 acres of surrounding wetlands, marshes, beaches, and woodlands.

Finestkind Cruises has three diesel-engine vessels making as many as 15 trips a day along the Ogunquit shore of Coastal Maine. The boats—named Finestkind I, II, and III—provide both covered and open-air seating, with on-board capacity ranging from 44 to 66 people.

Visitors to Ogunquit walk off their lobster roll consumption along the cliffs of Marginal Way, a paved path that wraps around rocky shores, along the margin of the land.