Japan Travel Guide

The pastry boutique was designed by Wonderwall, the cutting edge design firm behing Uniqlo stores.

International Japanese jewelry chain Tasaki Shinju specializes in pieces made from high-quality pearls. Browse the carefully curated collection of bracelets, necklaces, and earrings made from both salt- and fresh-water pearls.

Tokyo’s most impressive depachika (subterranean gourmet food market), Isetan may be the ultimate foodie destination.

The Cultural Experience Program organizes homestays and offers hands-on lessons on Japanese cuisine, dance, calligraphy, and ikebana (flower arranging). Four-week intensive summer courses start in July.

Set in a residential downtown-Tokyo neighborhood, Toyo Ito’s design of the new Za-Koenji public theater is unabashedly theatrical. The building is mysterious and all purple-black, its tentlike roof and walls punctuated by several hundred porthole-style windows.

The first Disney resort to be built outside the US, Tokyo Disney Resort receives more annual visitors than any of Disney's other international locations.

A whole store devoted to hoisery: that's Tabio, where shoppers can find anything to adorn the legs, from tights to socks to leg warmers to furry "boot covers" and "sockettes." Tabio fills a large, well-lit retail space with shelf after shelf of products for men and women, with a bent toward the c

Located on the lower floors of a kimono company, the complex includes a contemporary crafts shop, chic café, and steel-and-glass gallery exhibiting 450-year-old embroidered kimonos.

A cross between a French patisserie and an American cupcake shop, Tokyo Sweets Factory is located on the basement level of a Jiyugaoka office building.

To calm your preflight jitters, head to one of the airport’s seven clusters of black full-body electric massage chairs spaced about six feet apart.

For a unique night out in the city, attend a performance of Tsugaru shamisen, music with origins in northern Japan, played on a traditional three-stringed instrument called a shamisen. Seating is traditional-style on tatami mats, and a cover charge applies.

Brace Yourself: The name translates roughly to “hey, what the hell,” which is what you will hear others shouting in Japanese when you’re on this ride.