Japan

Japan Travel Guide

The Museum: Ramen noodles have been a staple in the Japanese diet since 1958, when the instant version was introduced. Since then, its popularity has exploded—Japan now has some 200,000 ramen restaurants.

A 14th-century Gold Pavilion.

Feel the beat of the music as omikoshi (portable shrines) mounted on palanquins are paraded through the streets of Tokyo’s Asakusa neighborhood the third weekend in May. The Shinto festival honors the founders of the Asakusa Shrine and Sensoji Temple.

One of the many fashion subcultures of Tokyo is the Lolita look: bows, lace, crinolines, and bonnets. In other words, clothes that appear to belong on fairytale characters.

A seven-meter, red-granite pool with an illuminated Jacuzzi is the centerpiece of Nagomi Spa, located at the Grand Hyatt Tokyo in Roppongi Hills. Created by acclaimed design firm Super Potato, the spa blends contemporary style with elements from old-fashioned Japanese bathhouses.

The store's tailors stitch men’s overcoats from wool, cotton, silk, and hemp.

On New Year's Day, eat osechi (a special feast of seafood and vegetables) and join the happy crowds huddling outside the Meiji- Jingu Shrine to get good tidings.

The Tokyo City View observation deck has floor-to-ceiling windows that provide panoramic views of Tokyo Tower, Haneda Airport, Mount Fuji, the island of Odaiba, and the Shibuya and Shinjuku districts.

Ukiyo-e woodblock prints, a uniquely Japanese art form, are the focus of this niche museum collection, bequethed by the estate of Seizo Ota, the late chairman of a major Japanese insurance company.

The riverside 685-year-old Zen monastery has 24 temples on the property.

Seventh-century Buddhist temple that has long been a magnet for travelers; a prayer chamber is open to visitors.

These reflexology and massage stations—there are four in total, spread throughout the airport’s two terminals—are removed from general foot traffic. Comfortable massage chairs are spaced far enough apart so you almost buy into the illusion of privacy—if you close your eyes.

Most tourists come to Kappabashi (Tokyo’s “Kitchen Town”) to pick up plastic sushi key chains and refrigerator magnets, but the real find is the wooden black-and-red lacquerware at Tanaka.