Japan

Japan Travel Guide

The gallery-like shop sells lacquered bamboo boxes and handwoven silk capes by local designers.

The Aoyama boutique of anti-fashion establishment designer Jun Takahashi reflects its owner's ethos: there are walls with no dry wall, only exposed metal frames and electrical wiring, and hundreds of bare light bulbs clustered together (only some of them lit) on the ceiling to create a beautifull

Occupying the 45th and 47th floors of the Park Hyatt Tokyo, the Club on the Park is a full-service spa open exclusively to hotel guests and private members.

Among the most popular toy stores in the city, Kiddy Land is a national chain with more than 80 locations throughout Japan.

New York-born Ivan Orkin's 12-counter-seat ramen house opened in 2007, originally drawing customers curious about a gaijin "noodle man," and later because of the flavor of his dishes.

Sushi chefs who arrive at the crack of dawn for the finest-grade tuna and yellowtail in the massive, centrally located Tsukiji-Jogai Market head to Sugimoto, sandwiched between other specialty stalls, to have their knives professionally honed.

Welcome to popular Japanese children's character (and lifestyle brand) Hello Kitty's world, where visitors can check out the friendly feline's castle, take a boat ride through her friends' cavernous underground apartments, and soar on a Ferris wheel of character heads.

There are 70 kinds of salt at the depachika (department store basement food hall). The vinegar sommelier holds tastings and sells "infuse-your-own-vinegar" kits.

In this minimalist space, an attendant seats guests along a row of self-serve tanks that pump exotically flavored oxygen, from eucalyptus menthol to cinnamon, into your lungs; choose from 10-minute (600 yen/$6) and 20-minute (1,200 yen/$12.50) sessions. The benefit?

To the right of the Kaminarimon—the gate opening onto Nakamise Dori, the narrow pedestrian-only shopping street leading to the Sensoji Temple—is this quaint shop specializing in washi, Japanese natural-fiber paper. It has been selling handmade paper and crafts since 1856.

The Japan Rail Pass - good for intercity travel - also works on the handy Yamanote Line, an above-ground train that encircles central Tokyo.

The airport’s largest bookstore—with titles in both Japanese and English—is impeccably organized and also carries DVDs, CDs, and video games. Pick up IQ84, the latest novel from celebrated Japanese writer Haruki Murakami.