Japan

Japan Travel Guide

The pastry boutique was designed by Wonderwall, the cutting edge design firm behing Uniqlo stores.

International Japanese jewelry chain Tasaki Shinju specializes in pieces made from high-quality pearls. Browse the carefully curated collection of bracelets, necklaces, and earrings made from both salt- and fresh-water pearls.

Tokyo’s most impressive depachika (subterranean gourmet food market), Isetan may be the ultimate foodie destination.

The Cultural Experience Program organizes homestays and offers hands-on lessons on Japanese cuisine, dance, calligraphy, and ikebana (flower arranging). Four-week intensive summer courses start in July.

Set in a residential downtown-Tokyo neighborhood, Toyo Ito’s design of the new Za-Koenji public theater is unabashedly theatrical. The building is mysterious and all purple-black, its tentlike roof and walls punctuated by several hundred porthole-style windows.

The first Disney resort to be built outside the US, Tokyo Disney Resort receives more annual visitors than any of Disney's other international locations.

A whole store devoted to hoisery: that's Tabio, where shoppers can find anything to adorn the legs, from tights to socks to leg warmers to furry "boot covers" and "sockettes." Tabio fills a large, well-lit retail space with shelf after shelf of products for men and women, with a bent toward the c

Located on the lower floors of a kimono company, the complex includes a contemporary crafts shop, chic café, and steel-and-glass gallery exhibiting 450-year-old embroidered kimonos.

A cross between a French patisserie and an American cupcake shop, Tokyo Sweets Factory is located on the basement level of a Jiyugaoka office building.

To calm your preflight jitters, head to one of the airport’s seven clusters of black full-body electric massage chairs spaced about six feet apart.

For a unique night out in the city, attend a performance of Tsugaru shamisen, music with origins in northern Japan, played on a traditional three-stringed instrument called a shamisen. Seating is traditional-style on tatami mats, and a cover charge applies.

Brace Yourself: The name translates roughly to “hey, what the hell,” which is what you will hear others shouting in Japanese when you’re on this ride.