Japan

Japan Travel Guide

Often called the "Japanese Gap," Uniqlo is a fashion retailer specializing in casual, affordable clothing for men, women, and children. While the company has more than 700 stores in Japan (and others worldwide), this flagship Ginza location is its biggest and flashiest.

Japanese pastry chef Sadaharu Aoki established a reputation in Paris before opening his all-white, ultra-modern Marunouchi shop, where exquisite pastries are displayed like works of art.

Welcome to popular Japanese children's character (and lifestyle brand) Hello Kitty's world, where visitors can check out the friendly feline's castle, take a boat ride through her friends' cavernous underground apartments, and soar on a Ferris wheel of character heads.

Both terminals have free observation decks, but the one attached to Terminal 1 offers the best views of the main runway. The spacious terrace is enclosed by netted fencing interrupted by several small windowesque openings for camera-wielding passengers.

To the right of the Kaminarimon—the gate opening onto Nakamise Dori, the narrow pedestrian-only shopping street leading to the Sensoji Temple—is this quaint shop specializing in washi, Japanese natural-fiber paper. It has been selling handmade paper and crafts since 1856.

France's top pasty provocatuer is a household name in Tokyo, with several boutiques and a swank marbled Bar Chocolat created by Wonderwall, the cutting-edge design firm behind Uniqlo stores.

The pastry boutique was designed by Wonderwall, the cutting edge design firm behing Uniqlo stores.

International Japanese jewelry chain Tasaki Shinju specializes in pieces made from high-quality pearls. Browse the carefully curated collection of bracelets, necklaces, and earrings made from both salt- and fresh-water pearls.

Tokyo’s most impressive depachika (subterranean gourmet food market), Isetan may be the ultimate foodie destination.

The Cultural Experience Program organizes homestays and offers hands-on lessons on Japanese cuisine, dance, calligraphy, and ikebana (flower arranging). Four-week intensive summer courses start in July.

Set in a residential downtown-Tokyo neighborhood, Toyo Ito’s design of the new Za-Koenji public theater is unabashedly theatrical. The building is mysterious and all purple-black, its tentlike roof and walls punctuated by several hundred porthole-style windows.