Restaurants in Japan

Some of the world’s best French restaurants can be found in Tokyo, and our favorite among them is elegant Les Saisons, in the Imperial Hotel. At the helm is Chef Thierry Voisin, who was most recently at three-Michelin-starred Les Crayères in Reims.

Cantonese-food fans come to this uncanny simulacrum of downtown Kowloon.

A welcome lunch break when shopping in Ginza, this restaurant serves kaiseki, multicourse meals of small, traditional dishes. The emphasis is on presentation, seasonal ingredients, and exquisite service.

This brightly lit, open-air space filled with wooden tables dishes up traditional Japanese specialties such as dashi jouyu udon, noodles served cold with lemon, grated daikon (white radish), and sliced leek. Sit at the long counter that stretches along the window for runway views.

Diners at this kaiten sushi or "revolving sushi" restaurant select from a never-ending parade of sushi on conveyer belts.

Known for its steamed Chinese pork buns, noodle bowls, and "hairy crabs" (a delicacy in season during the fall), 50 Ban is a no-frills, street food lunch and dinner spot in the former geisha district of Tokyo (now considered the French neighborhood).

A Parisian sidewalk cafe in one of Tokyo's toniest neighborhoods, Anniversaire is a popular pit stop for shoppers who need to fuel up or relax after shopping at nearby designer stores, such as Chanel, Dior, and Prada.

One of the last vestiges of pre-war architecture in Shinjuku, the building housing the flagship Tsunahachi tempura restaurant (there are now dozens of them all over Japan) stands out amid the nearby skyscrapers.

The house specialty is a refined version of oden (Japanese hot pot). Sit at the counter, select your oden ingredients from a large brass pot, and sip an atsu-kan (hot sake) such as the seasonal Kikuhime Junmai.

Located on the edge of Aoyama National Cemetary, Kaotan Ramen has a notably shabby exterior and simple interior: a long, worn wooden table and benches across from an enclosed kitchen with an order window.

Bauhaus meets Bushido at Ogata’s Higashi-yama restaurant, where everything from the impeccable seafood concoctions to the décor is the product of a rigorously creative mind. The fatty-salmon salad drizzled with yuzu sauce is edible haiku.

On a single street in Tsukishima (a manmade island in the city), there are approximately 50 restaurants serving monja, a kind of pancake (some say omlette) made from a batter poured atop meat or seafood, onions, and cabbage, cooked on a teppan griddle. Monja Hazama, distinguishe

"Toriyoshi is a Japanese yakitori chain. This location is in the central Minato neighborhood, close to the Omotesando subway station. Don't let a bias against chains throw you off-there are great ones throughout Japan. This place has amazing ji-dori, or ground chicken.