Japan

Restaurants in Japan

Most restaurants in Japan serve local dishes, which consists mainly of rice, miso, fish, noodles, and seasonal vegetables. The local diet is relatively healthy, which is why Japan has a much lower obesity rate than other developed nations. However, in recent years international cuisine has become incredibly popular; it’s now possible to find Japanese restaurants that serve anything from American food to Italian to French cuisine.

However, when in Japan, eat as the Japanese do. Tokyo in particular – which boasts some of the best restaurants in Japan -- is a food lover’s paradise. It contains more Michelin-starred restaurants than any other city in the world. Don’t leave without stopping at Daiwa Sushi. Wait times can easily exceed one hour, but it’s worth it: the sashimi melts in your mouth. Japanese restaurants are also known for their noodle dishes, and it would be a crime to leave the country without sampling at least one bowl of ramen and udon.

The fare at this international café with floor-to-ceiling windows overlooking the runway ranges from American-style hamburgers to a bowl of udon (or Japanese wheat) noodles with fried shrimp. Not hungry? Try a 12-year-old Suntory Yamazaki, an excellent Japanese single malt whiskey.

Japan's love affair with the ramen noodle is celebrated at the Shin-Yokohama Ramen Museum, an interactive exhibit space that includes a ramen 'theme park' with recreated mid-20th-century ramen shops from around Japan.

Black laquer, red accents, and floor-to-ceiling windows set the tone for French celebrity chef Joel Robuchon's Roppongi Hills venue, where diners at the the 44-seat counter watch black-clad chefs prepare creative dishes inspired by Mediterranean flavors and the simplicty of Japanese culinary trad

Well heeled Ginza shoppers and ladies who lunch converge at the lounge on the 3rd floor of Mikimoto's Ginza 2 Building, also known as "the Swiss Cheese Building" because of its distinticivly shaped, randomly placed windows.