Japan

Hotels in Japan

Hotels in Japan range from internationally-renowned luxury resorts to budget guesthouses. While Western-style Japanese hotels are widely available throughout the country, try booking a room at a ryokan, a Japanese-style inn where guests sleep on tatami mats on the floor and are typically treated to a full traditional Japanese breakfast in the morning.

Those looking for the ultimate luxury getaway should check out the Park Hyatt Hotel. It's considered to be one of the best hotels in Japan – and one of the most famous after it was prominently featured in the Academy Award–winning film Lost in Translation. Rooms start on the 41st floor, ensuring that each one has a sweeping view of the dazzling city below. The hotel also offers a range of top-tier amenities, including an indoor pool, a steakhouse and a full-service spa.

Those searching for more affordable hotels in Japan should consider booking into a capsule hotel, where guests can rent a ‘capsule,’ i.e. a small sleeping compartment. Capsules are stacked on top of one another, which means that the space is tight, but the ‘room’ is cheap.

Located on floors 14—17 of a quiet office building in the business district, the Celestine Hotel caters to corporate travelers but provides plenty of amenities for leisure guests, as well.

Just outside the busy Shinjuku Station, the Keio Plaza Hotel is about as centrally located as you can get in Tokyo. The huge marble lobby lit by oversize chandeliers sets the tone: this hotel is big and grand, somewhat traditional, catering primarily to the international business traveler.

This 387-room midtown hotel is part of the lively Roppongi Hills complex (often dubbed a "city within a city"), crammed with hundreds of luxury boutiques, cafes, and a multiplex theater, open through the night on weekends.

Overlooking the Hie Shrine, one of Tokyo’s most historic Shinto shrines, this Kengo Kuma–designed property is a quiet oasis in central Tokyo. In the 29-floor steel-and-glass tower, 251 contemporary guest rooms are understated yet elegant, with traditional shoji paper screens.

A multicourse breakfast is served by a room attendant bearing a tray laden with such morsels as grilled trout, seasonal tofu, miso soup, and a variety of teas. Sit at the low table and contemplate a view of the manicured garden at this venerable ryokan inn.

Overlooking one of Tokyo's most famous shrines, the Asakusa View is a classic downtown Tokyo hotel, complete with an impressive marble lobby and crystal chandeliers. Guest rooms have a vintage feel, with wallpaper and furnishings reminiscent of the 80s or 90s, but many are spacious.

Despite its massive size, the Prince Park Tower Tokyo still manages to be is a quiet refuge in Tokyo’s Minato district.