Japan

Hotels in Japan

Hotels in Japan range from internationally-renowned luxury resorts to budget guesthouses. While Western-style Japanese hotels are widely available throughout the country, try booking a room at a ryokan, a Japanese-style inn where guests sleep on tatami mats on the floor and are typically treated to a full traditional Japanese breakfast in the morning.

Those looking for the ultimate luxury getaway should check out the Park Hyatt Hotel. It's considered to be one of the best hotels in Japan – and one of the most famous after it was prominently featured in the Academy Award–winning film Lost in Translation. Rooms start on the 41st floor, ensuring that each one has a sweeping view of the dazzling city below. The hotel also offers a range of top-tier amenities, including an indoor pool, a steakhouse and a full-service spa.

Those searching for more affordable hotels in Japan should consider booking into a capsule hotel, where guests can rent a ‘capsule,’ i.e. a small sleeping compartment. Capsules are stacked on top of one another, which means that the space is tight, but the ‘room’ is cheap.

A multicourse breakfast is served by a room attendant bearing a tray laden with such morsels as grilled trout, seasonal tofu, miso soup, and a variety of teas. Sit at the low table and contemplate a view of the manicured garden at this venerable ryokan inn.

Overlooking one of Tokyo's most famous shrines, the Asakusa View is a classic downtown Tokyo hotel, complete with an impressive marble lobby and crystal chandeliers. Guest rooms have a vintage feel, with wallpaper and furnishings reminiscent of the 80s or 90s, but many are spacious.

Despite its massive size, the Prince Park Tower Tokyo still manages to be is a quiet refuge in Tokyo’s Minato district.

This 17-room ryokan in Gion, the traditional geisha quarter, holds candlelit evening tea ceremonies and makes a good base for exploring the city's many temples.

Located near Tokyo Station in the Mitsui Tower, the Mandarin Oriental rises above the historical merchant district of Nihonbashi—and enjoys unprecedented city views. Inside lies a sophisticated and modern oasis of calm.

This hotel puts you on Tokyo's jam-packed shopping street, with many of the city's best restaurants, including the three Michelin–starred Japanese Koju, and L'Osier, by renowned French chef Bruno Menard.

The rooms of this traditional ryokan look out over the Seto Inland Sea.

Billed as Kyoto’s first design hotel, the property opened in 2007 with 13 unique rooms: No. 201 has a sexy red, black, and white scheme.

A sense of mystery and magic pervades this secluded retreat on a southern Japanese island covered in old-growth cedars.

Located on floors 28—37 of the Tokyo Shiodome Building, this Conrad hotel is known for its minimalist style and expansive views.