Japan

Hotels in Japan

Hotels in Japan range from internationally-renowned luxury resorts to budget guesthouses. While Western-style Japanese hotels are widely available throughout the country, try booking a room at a ryokan, a Japanese-style inn where guests sleep on tatami mats on the floor and are typically treated to a full traditional Japanese breakfast in the morning.

Those looking for the ultimate luxury getaway should check out the Park Hyatt Hotel. It's considered to be one of the best hotels in Japan – and one of the most famous after it was prominently featured in the Academy Award–winning film Lost in Translation. Rooms start on the 41st floor, ensuring that each one has a sweeping view of the dazzling city below. The hotel also offers a range of top-tier amenities, including an indoor pool, a steakhouse and a full-service spa.

Those searching for more affordable hotels in Japan should consider booking into a capsule hotel, where guests can rent a ‘capsule,’ i.e. a small sleeping compartment. Capsules are stacked on top of one another, which means that the space is tight, but the ‘room’ is cheap.

This hotel puts you on Tokyo's jam-packed shopping street, with many of the city's best restaurants, including the three Michelin–starred Japanese Koju, and L'Osier, by renowned French chef Bruno Menard.

Billed as Kyoto’s first design hotel, the property opened in 2007 with 13 unique rooms: No. 201 has a sexy red, black, and white scheme.

The rooms of this traditional ryokan look out over the Seto Inland Sea.

Years after its starring role in the hit indie film Lost in Translation, the Park Hyatt Tokyo—housed in the upper floors of a handsome steel Kenzo Tange tower near Yoyogi Park in Shinjuku—continues to draw moviegoers and discerning travelers alike.

Located on floors 28—37 of the Tokyo Shiodome Building, this Conrad hotel is known for its minimalist style and expansive views.

A sense of mystery and magic pervades this secluded retreat on a southern Japanese island covered in old-growth cedars.

With a prime location on a corner facing the Imperial Palace and Hibiya Park, and within walking distance of Ginza and the newly named “Golden Triangle” (Hibiya, Marunouchi, and Yurakucho), The Peninsula Tokyo wowed travelers when it opened September 2007, book-ending the city’s hotel boom.

Understated Japanese style, with expert service and an art museum spotlighting more than 2,000 Buddhist works. 

Just outside the busy Shinjuku Station, the Keio Plaza Hotel is about as centrally located as you can get in Tokyo. The huge marble lobby lit by oversize chandeliers sets the tone: this hotel is big and grand, somewhat traditional, catering primarily to the international business traveler.

This 387-room midtown hotel is part of the lively Roppongi Hills complex (often dubbed a "city within a city"), crammed with hundreds of luxury boutiques, cafes, and a multiplex theater, open through the night on weekends.

Formerly Four Seasons Hotel Tokyo at Chinzan-so

On 17 acres of Japanese gardens in downtown Tokyo, with some of the city’s largest guest rooms.