Japan

Hotels in Japan

Years after its starring role in the hit indie film Lost in Translation, the Park Hyatt Tokyo—housed in the upper floors of a handsome steel Kenzo Tange tower near Yoyogi Park in Shinjuku—continues to draw moviegoers and discerning travelers alike.

Located on floors 28—37 of the Tokyo Shiodome Building, this Conrad hotel is known for its minimalist style and expansive views.

A sense of mystery and magic pervades this secluded retreat on a southern Japanese island covered in old-growth cedars.

With a prime location on a corner facing the Imperial Palace and Hibiya Park, and within walking distance of Ginza and the newly named “Golden Triangle” (Hibiya, Marunouchi, and Yurakucho), The Peninsula Tokyo wowed travelers when it opened September 2007, book-ending the city’s hotel boom.

Understated Japanese style, with expert service and an art museum spotlighting more than 2,000 Buddhist works. 

This 387-room midtown hotel is part of the lively Roppongi Hills complex (often dubbed a "city within a city"), crammed with hundreds of luxury boutiques, cafes, and a multiplex theater, open through the night on weekends.

Just outside the busy Shinjuku Station, the Keio Plaza Hotel is about as centrally located as you can get in Tokyo. The huge marble lobby lit by oversize chandeliers sets the tone: this hotel is big and grand, somewhat traditional, catering primarily to the international business traveler.

Formerly Four Seasons Hotel Tokyo at Chinzan-so

On 17 acres of Japanese gardens in downtown Tokyo, with some of the city’s largest guest rooms.

Hiirogiya is among Kyoto’s most illustrious ryokan. Their 33 rooms— featuring lacquered bathrooms with wooden tubs—have hosted the likes of Elizabeth Taylor and Charlie Chaplin. A night at this 145-year-old staple includes a kaiseki dinner served in your room.

Overlooking the Hie Shrine, one of Tokyo’s most historic Shinto shrines, this Kengo Kuma–designed property is a quiet oasis in central Tokyo. In the 29-floor steel-and-glass tower, 251 contemporary guest rooms are understated yet elegant, with traditional shoji paper screens.

The hotel is set in Shibuya's tallest skyscraper, just west of Harajuku.

Just shy of East Tokyo, in the Higashiyama Shichijo district, is the Hyatt Regency Kyoto. The 189-room hotel is decked out in traditional flourishes—kimono fabric headboards, washi paper lampshades, and deep wooden Hiba tubs in the bathrooms—though international luxury standards still apply.