Italy

Italy Travel Guide

Italy’s largest airport served more than 36 million passengers in 2010. Located in Fiumicino, approximately 20 miles from Rome’s historic center, this bustling airport is a hub for Alitalia.

Follow the pathway up the Salita di San Giorgio, past the yellow Church of San Giorgio, to the 16th-century castle, named after a British consul in Genoa, Montague Yeats Brown. Tip: This is the best place to take spectacular photographs of the town.

The hand-painted floor tiles and ceramic plates decorating the hotels and restaurants along the coast come from the famous workshops of Vietri sul Mare, a suburb of Salerno at the east end of Amalfi Drive.

Take a “time out” from the hustle and bustle of Rome and wander the gravel paths of public park Villa Sciarra, named after the adjacent 17th-century Barberini family villa.

The contemporary art dealer's eponymous gallery.

The Sicily-based school doesn’t teach much dialect, but there are plenty of ways to absorb local culture in the sun-soaked, seaside town of Taormina: students take classes in the kitchens of residents. Courses range from one to 24 weeks.

Created in 2006, the FPS has hosted a clutch of exhibitions that have earned international praise; 2010’s Bronzino retrospective—the most comprehensive to date of the Mannerist painter’s work—garnered unprecedented attendance and requests from major American and European museums to host it.

One-day market and culinary tours of Florence with Tuscan-food expert Faith Willinger.