Italy

Italy Travel Guide

There are endless possibilities for things to do in Italy. As the seat of Western Civilization, there are many museums and historical sites that are not to be missed. The ruins from the Roman Empire can be seen across the land, but nowhere as well as in Rome itself. Standing inside the Coliseum as the sun sets over the City of Seven Hills is an experience not soon forgotten. There are many beautiful ecclesiastical sites—the foremost being the illustrious Vatican, seat of power for the Catholic Church and former Holy Roman Empire. It’s worth a visit to admire St. Peter’s Basilica and gaze at the frescoed ceiling of the Sistine Chapel.

If you are wondering what to do in Italy for shopping—look no further than the cobblestone streets of Via de' Tornabuoni in Florence. Stroll through the designer shops and save an hour for a turn through the Ferragamo Museum before hitting the picturesque Ponte Vecchio. For high fashion, Milan is the go-to city, especially during fashion week when models and designers arrive in droves to roam the streets in their seasonal finery.

There are many outdoor things to do in Italy, from stunning beaches to gorgeous hikes and bike rides through vineyards and olive groves. Check out the Travel + Leisure guide to discover what to do in Italy.

Ferrari-philes will find all manner of merchandise here related to their favorite performance autos. The shop carries everything from logo-emblazoned key chains and T-shirts (starting at $45) to racy leather jackets to silver reproduction pistons from the 360 Modena Spider (about $850).

The designer opened his Roman atelier in 1960, and his timeless sensibility lives on at the landmark boutique with its red-carpeted staircase and dizzyingly high-heeled pumps.

Peter Lloyd, president of Century Travel, utilizes over 20 years of experience to help journeyers discover the life-changing power of world travel.

When planning a visit to the winding streets of the Trastevere neighborhood, earmark time to meander these ancient gardens. Locally known as Orto Botanico, this land was first cultivated by Pope Nicholas III in the late 13th century, and is now owned by the Sapienza University of Rome.

The Carlo Levi Center has many of the author-cum-artist's paintings on view.

Located in the city's Diladdarno art district, the photography and video gallery, showcases cutting-edge talent such as Israeli street-art photographer David Kassman and Italy's Massimo Listri.

Named after King Louis IX, this church was built as a house of worship for French people living in Rome in 1518. The Italian marble façade and interior with touches of gold was constructed with funds from Catherine de Medici, who was married to King Henry II of France.

One of Italy's legendary opera houses; its season runs from January to mid-April.

Well-chosen Salentine crafts.