Italy

Restaurants in Italy

Restaurants in Italy are the best in the world because Italian life revolves around meals—a quick breakfast, a long lunch, an espresso break, and aperitivo drinks that blend into an all-night dinner. You will not go hungry in Italy, and more importantly you will be enchanted by every new culinary delight that you try, so say, “si, per favore” to everything! From a delicious meal of Tuscan peasant fare to some of the finest dining in the world, Italy restaurants will suit all your tastes. Restaurants in Italy not only serve mouthwatering food, but many world-class bottles of wine and famous local cocktails, so be sure to consult the sommelier for recommendations. Check out the Travel + Leisure list below to find the best restaurants in Italy.

You could eat breakfast at this historic, aristocratic landmark every day for three months and never have the same pastry twice. Like all Italians, the Parmesans like their cornetti filled with just a scraping of preserves.

White candles illuminate the communal wooden tables at the family-run L’Enoteca Marcucci, a lively wine bar and restaurant. Michele Marcucci plies wines from his 2,000 label–strong cellar, while his father, Giuseppe, grills butter-soft Tuscan beefsteaks.

Built in a former stone quarry, this family-owned restaurant has an outdoor terrace that juts out over the Gulf of Salerno, providing views of the surrounding cliffs and the yachts floating on the water below.

Just steps from the Piazza di Spagna, Ristorante Nino, with a stone-walled exterior, sits along a relatively quiet cobblestone side street.

You may have to compete with celebs, such as Denzel Washington and Giorgio Armani, for one of the 15 outdoor tables on Puny’s patio, but fortunately, there are another 14 tables inside. The simple dishes like handmade pappardelle pasta with tomato and pesto taste as good indoors as al fresco.

Come for the best plain focaccia.

Opened in 2003, this library/café in the Pigneto district provides a destination for those seeking a good read, a cup of coffee, an organic snack, and spirited conversation. The interior boasts bookshelves and several small tables.

The ricciola, a fish similar to pompano, is topped with wafer-thin potatoes soaked in olive oil, ringed by olives, then baked in a very hot oven.

Sozzani’s favorite restaurant is housed in a 500-year-old palazzo and serves the town’s best tortelli di zucca (pumpkin ravioli).

Stop by this dairy and cheesemaker for perfect Parmesan.