Italy

Restaurants in Italy

Restaurants in Italy are the best in the world because Italian life revolves around meals—a quick breakfast, a long lunch, an espresso break, and aperitivo drinks that blend into an all-night dinner. You will not go hungry in Italy, and more importantly you will be enchanted by every new culinary delight that you try, so say, “si, per favore” to everything! From a delicious meal of Tuscan peasant fare to some of the finest dining in the world, Italy restaurants will suit all your tastes. Restaurants in Italy not only serve mouthwatering food, but many world-class bottles of wine and famous local cocktails, so be sure to consult the sommelier for recommendations. Check out the Travel + Leisure list below to find the best restaurants in Italy.

Named for a Genovese doge (who was also the subject of a Verdi opera), Simon Boccanegra occupies the ground floor of 16th-century Palazzo Salviati in the Santa Croce quarter, and the location is a large part of its appeal.

Eat on the garden terrace, suspended almost a thousand feet above the sea in Castellabate.

The famous Michelin-starred La Mora still keeps tradition in check after 143 years with its inventive cooking.

Davide Palluda, the talented young chef at All’Enoteca restaurant, in the small Langhe town of Canale, not far from Alba, packs duck, rabbit, and guinea fowl into olive oil and waits three long years until they achieve the plush concentration of a confit (crazy-good!).

Soccer players, Hollywood stars, famous artists, and locals from the neighborhood all line up outside Pizzeria da Baffetto to wait patiently for a table to open up in the crammed rooms of one of Rome's most stalwart traditional pizzerie: open only at dinner (only tourists eat pizza at lunch), wit

Returning home to his native Sicily after years abroad studying culinary arts, Accusio Craparo has earned a reputation as one of the island’s most exciting new chefs. The Michelin Guide even awarded his restaurant, La Gazza Ladra, a coveted star.

In the coastal town of Fregene, approximately 30 miles outside the center of Rome, this restaurant is a small family-owned establishment specializing in local seafood.

Modeled after the Bottega del Vino in Verona, Italy, this restaurant on the southeast corner of Central Park serves north Italian dishes like rosemary-encrusted salmon, braised baby octopus, and tortellini stuffed with beef and prosciutto in a black truffle sauce.

Owned by a Sicilian who learned the art of ice cream–making from his grandfather, this small gelato parlor is considered the city’s best by many Florentines.

Say you knew some stylish, young, design-conscious Parmesans. And say they’d just redone an old farmhouse outside the city. Their eat-in kitchen might look like Croce di Malta. The concise menu (supple tortelli, fragile polpettine, silky Bavarian cream) changes daily.