Italy

Restaurants in Italy

Checchino is a traditional Roman restaurant originally opened in 1887 by the Mariani family.

Venice’s most authentic osteria. Inside, patrons fill up on Venetian cicheti such as lightly spiced meatballs, a pre-dinner favorite.

Northern Italian cuisine made with regional ingredients such as tortelloni stuffed with chamois and wild-berry butter.

This trattoria in the Prati neighborhood serves up classic Italian regional dishes with modern twists. Suppli, fried tidbits of rice, ground meat, mozzarella, and tomato sauce are presented in sections of cardboard egg cartons one day and colorful paper cones the next.

Splurge on dinner at the rustic-chic Michelin-starred restaurant, in the ancient town of Soragna.

Set in a centuries-old botanical garden, La Contrada serves regional specialties such as vegetable ravioli with dried-tomato gremolata and mozzarella mousse on a terrace overlooking the lake.

Don’t be fooled by the entrance, under a tunnel along the main coastal road: La Caravella has been one of the area’s finest restaurants for nearly 50 years, a required culinary stop since Federico Fellini, Andy Warhol, and Jackie Kennedy put it on the map in the 1960s.

One of the most delicious aspects of Italian cooking is an expertly prepared Mediterranean seafood meal, and this is the best place in Rome to have one.

On an unassuming street near Santo Spirito in the Oltrarno, this contemporary trattoria offers stylish decor, a hip atmosphere, and tasty, inventive dishes ranging from salt cod carpaccio to the house-speciality breaded 'elephant ear' pork chop, even a cheeseburger and house-made chips.

The simply furnished restaurant (ivory tablecloths, black-and-white photos) in the San Frediano quarter is a favorite among locals, who come for experimental and traditional Italian cooking (scallops, quail eggs, and bacon; lamb fillet with cabbage).