Italy

Restaurants in Italy

Restaurants in Italy are the best in the world because Italian life revolves around meals—a quick breakfast, a long lunch, an espresso break, and aperitivo drinks that blend into an all-night dinner. You will not go hungry in Italy, and more importantly you will be enchanted by every new culinary delight that you try, so say, “si, per favore” to everything! From a delicious meal of Tuscan peasant fare to some of the finest dining in the world, Italy restaurants will suit all your tastes. Restaurants in Italy not only serve mouthwatering food, but many world-class bottles of wine and famous local cocktails, so be sure to consult the sommelier for recommendations. Check out the Travel + Leisure list below to find the best restaurants in Italy.

Housed inside the Palazzo delle Esposizioni (Rome’s largest interdisciplinary exhibition center), Open Colonna itself is a work of modern art.

Located on a quiet side street in the Monti district, La Taverna dei Fori Imperiali (the Tavern of the Imperial Forum) is an unassuming, family-run restaurant just five minutes from the eponymous forum.

Cooler in spirit than the city's traditional cafés.

Just finding the entrance to Sora Margherita is part of the experience at this hole-in-the-wall trattoria in the old Jewish ghetto.

The outdoor terrace is seductively shrouded in bougainvillea and the aromas of a superior kitchen. Tuck into a langoustine that might as well be butter, amazing red mullet, fatty raw oysters, and a sauce of balsamic, oil, pepper, salt, and, yes, fellow kebab-defenders, soy.

The city's best kosher option serves a mean lox, couscous, and falafel.

After a day sizzling in the Positano sun, there’s nothing better than taking a 20-minute ride up to the mountain hamlet of Montepertuso for the cool breezes and the refined, inventive cooking of the Villani sisters.

One of Florence’s first wine bars, Pane e Vino (Bread and Wine) is just a 10-minute walk from the Ponte Vecchio (Old Bridge).

For foodies, it’s worth travelling hours on dicey roads to get to Caffe Sicilia on the southeast coast for the unique cold patisserie dishes from chef Corrado Assenza.