Restaurants in Italy

At the touristy but still vital Buca di Sant Antonio restaurant, lunch on grilled baby goat cooked on the spit along with an artichoke pudding.

Trieste’s famous 19th-century restaurant's décor is slightly kitschy, a sort of Eastern European farmhouse style, and the food, in keeping, is meat. Families are gathered around platters of succulent beef and lamb just off the open grill.

It may be located on the lower level of a ho-hum hotel, but the food that comes out of this diminutive kitchen is anything but.

Located at 7 Via Gonfalone and housed in a 16th-century building, Gonfalone restaurant offers guests the chance to relax and dine inside before a tall, copper-hooded fireplace or beneath lanterns filled with flickering candles.

From Food +  Wine: Longtime Harry's Bar manager Lucio Zanon brought glamour and great food back to this former celebrity stomping ground with a stunning restoration in 2000.

Each morning, the chefs of La Cambusa purchase fresh fish and seafood from local fishermen and turn them into dishes like octopus salad, spaghetti with sautéed mussels, and linguini with lobster.

Tucked away where Via di San Teodoro meets the western end of the Circus Maximus, this Parisian-style pasticceria is a little off the beaten path. The emphasis at this upscale sweet shop is on cakes and tarts, which are created in individual or miniature sizes and available to take out.

The restaurant doubles as the town hall and serves caponata, a Sicilian staple of eggplant, olives, capers, and tomatoes.

Don’t let the inauspicious location—on a side street in this large modern resort town—deter you from experiencing some of the coast’s freshest seafood and best pizza.