Restaurants in Italy

A classic Italian alimentari (deli), Volpetti in the Testaccio area offers an overwhelming selection of meats, breads, and cheeses.

Only those in the know will find their way to this hidden gem within a maze of winding alleys. Over the past couple of years the portions have become less generous, but antipasti such as sour eggplant and creamed codfish are among the best in town.

The outdoor terrace is seductively shrouded in bougainvillea and the aromas of a superior kitchen. Tuck into a langoustine that might as well be butter, amazing red mullet, fatty raw oysters, and a sauce of balsamic, oil, pepper, salt, and, yes, fellow kebab-defenders, soy.

The city's best kosher option serves a mean lox, couscous, and falafel.

After a day sizzling in the Positano sun, there’s nothing better than taking a 20-minute ride up to the mountain hamlet of Montepertuso for the cool breezes and the refined, inventive cooking of the Villani sisters.

One of Florence’s first wine bars, Pane e Vino (Bread and Wine) is just a 10-minute walk from the Ponte Vecchio (Old Bridge).

For foodies, it’s worth travelling hours on dicey roads to get to Caffe Sicilia on the southeast coast for the unique cold patisserie dishes from chef Corrado Assenza.

Il Gelato di San Crispino has two locations: the original, 15-year-old shop at the Basilica of San Giovanni and a branch near the Trevi Fountain. Try the signature San Crispino flavor with corbezzolo (wild-strawberry-tree honey from Sardinia).

Located on a quiet side street in the Monti district, La Taverna dei Fori Imperiali (the Tavern of the Imperial Forum) is an unassuming, family-run restaurant just five minutes from the eponymous forum.