Italy

Restaurants in Italy

The posh Cibreino ranks as one of the city's most famous dining destinations. A few doors away, at its sister location, you can share communal wooden tables but eat the same Tuscan specialties—such as stuffed chicken neck or yellow pepper soup—at half the price.

Three blocks from the Tevere River, this Roman-centric restaurant's decor evokes the 1970’s. Exposed wooden beams are situated overhead, while yellow tiles line the floor, matching the yellow tablecloths and napkins.

Expect a wait at this hole-in-the-wall gelato parlor where owner Carlo Pistacchi serves up his unusual flavors of gelato—artichoke, fig, and ginger.

Just below the jagged, 10,000-foot-high Sassolungo peak sits this popular lunchtime spot which offers grilled fish and generously portioned tiramisu.

Aldrovandi Villa Borghese in Parioli

At this enoteca con cucina, share soft chickpea farinata, triangles of airy pesto quiche, crudités, and first-rate salumi.

For a sit-down lunch, snag a balcony seat at the very un-Chinese Shanghai Trattoria, known for its eggplant caponata, pasta con le sarde, and a raffish setting straight out of a mafia flick.

Anyone weary from traipsing the cobblestones in the Centro Storico will love this innovative and relaxed bilevel restaurant, where you can drop in for a breather and a bite (and AC) almost any time of day.

The bar and restaurant near Teatro La Fenice eschews typically fusty Venetian ambience in favor of spider-web metal chairs, a chameleon-hued backlit bar, and a loud sound system. Dinner and after-theatre snacks are served until 2 a.m.

Roccalbegna is a dramatically set and charming town in the south of Tuscany, and one of the regions well-kept secrets. La Pietra is another. Tiny, family-run with exquisitely-cared-for food.

Our home away from home. This unpretentious trattoria specializing in fish is in the most beautiful countryside of Tuscany. The fish is always fresh (the sea is only 30 minutes away), the spices the tasty and the desserts are the best.