Italy

Restaurants in Italy

Restaurants in Italy are the best in the world because Italian life revolves around meals—a quick breakfast, a long lunch, an espresso break, and aperitivo drinks that blend into an all-night dinner. You will not go hungry in Italy, and more importantly you will be enchanted by every new culinary delight that you try, so say, “si, per favore” to everything! From a delicious meal of Tuscan peasant fare to some of the finest dining in the world, Italy restaurants will suit all your tastes. Restaurants in Italy not only serve mouthwatering food, but many world-class bottles of wine and famous local cocktails, so be sure to consult the sommelier for recommendations. Check out the Travel + Leisure list below to find the best restaurants in Italy.

Take a seat in the design-minded café with a bookstore. In the shadow of a monumental palazzo, taste tiny roasted potatoes; focaccia with artichokes, prosciutto, mortadella, and mozzarella; and a farfalle salad tangy with capers.

Coming from the kitchen of Italy’s first restaurant to win three Michelin stars, chef Carlo Cracco teamed with gourmet food seller Peck to launch a new restaurant two blocks from the duomo that serves innovated Milanese dishes like egg yolk spaghetti, risotto with black sesame and apple, and ink

Attached to a funky business hotel in the once-gritty, gradually gentrifying, nightclub-rich Ostiense area, this ambitious spot has emerged as one of the most enjoyable modern dining experiences in Rome.

A lively restaurant in a brick cellar in the town center. Try the creamy scrambled eggs with grated truffles.

Located in the village of Ponteromito and operating since 1908, this restaurant serves traditional, regional dishes. Homemade pasta dishes, like ricotta-stuffed ravioli topped with a walnut and mushroom sauce, are specialties.

A platter of sbrisolona sits on a counter inside the front door, a good start. The menu gives the age and maker of the prosciutto (28 months, Leporati), and culatello (20 months, Consorzio di Zibello), another excellent sign.

Throughout the Campania region of southern Italy, the Fischetti family is famous for their restaurant in Vallesaccarda Avellino, which for three generations has served Irpinian dishes like ricotta ravioli in walnut sauce, fusilli with artichokes and lamb meatballs, and rabbit in spicy tomato sauc

A five-minute drive north of Lucca is the glass- walled dining room at the Michelin-starred Ristorante La Mora. With just 10 tables, the low-key restaurant is disturbed only occasionally by the faint roar of a passing train.

Every morning owner Cristian Ponzini sails out on Como to catch lavarello and other native fish to serve at his glass-walled restaurant. Ponzini is one of the few who have fishing rights on the lake—a privilege that has been passed down through his family for generations.

Positano’s most stylish bar and restaurant serves freshly made, regionally sourced dishes—like fried ravioli with ricotta and mozzarella on a bed of fresh tomatoes—in a slick interior with floor cushions and a softly lit courtyard.

Well-heeled tourists and visiting celebrities have been coming to Harry's Bar, a Venice institution, since Giuseppe Cipriani opened it right on the St. Mark's waterfront in 1931.

Run by the same proprietors who own Casa Bleve—one of Rome’s best enotecas—this wine bar chain offers an impressive list of vintages (including many from the owners’ own Tuscan vineyard, Marchesi de’ Frescobaldi).