Italy

Restaurants in Italy

Restaurants in Italy are the best in the world because Italian life revolves around meals—a quick breakfast, a long lunch, an espresso break, and aperitivo drinks that blend into an all-night dinner. You will not go hungry in Italy, and more importantly you will be enchanted by every new culinary delight that you try, so say, “si, per favore” to everything! From a delicious meal of Tuscan peasant fare to some of the finest dining in the world, Italy restaurants will suit all your tastes. Restaurants in Italy not only serve mouthwatering food, but many world-class bottles of wine and famous local cocktails, so be sure to consult the sommelier for recommendations. Check out the Travel + Leisure list below to find the best restaurants in Italy.

The Osteria del Tempo Perso ("Inn of Lost Time") is squirreled into cavelike rooms off one of the many narrow alleys in Ostuni, a hilltop cluster of whitewashed buildings nicknamed The White City.

Situated atop La Rinascente, a four-story department store on the edge of Piazza della Repubblica, Terrazza is a small, open-air rooftop café with about a dozen tables. The menu is reasonably priced and includes coffee, tea, wine, and light snacks such as panini and pastries.

Located in Noto’s historical district, Le Ularie restaurant specializes in fresh, simply prepared seafood.

From the outside, this den of seafood looks more like a beach shack than upscale restaurant from one of the city's more recognizable restaurateurs. Chef Renatone, a regular on television, is an imposing figure who likes to make appearances in the dining room for his celebrity-filled clientele.

You won’t find bow-tied waiters or elaborate gourmet dishes at La Casalinga (“The Housewife”). Instead, Florentines—and the occasional tour group—pile in here for the friendly, family atmosphere and the heaped platters of authentic, homemade cuisine.

Order dense, flourless chocolaty squares of torta barozzi, a singular family specialty from the 1800's hinting surprisingly of peanuts. Enjoy it at a table beneath a pretty covered walkway.

Just a little off the beaten path on Borgo Ognissanti near the Communal Theater, the family-run Trattoria Armando offers cucina casaligna (homemade food) in a narrow dining room decorated with autographed photos of the opera stars who've eaten there.

Firouz Galdo, an Iranian-born architect working in Rome, was brought in to create a contemporary space full of light, wood, and pewter—the whole thing could easily sit atop a Hong Kong skyscraper. Grano Salis, full of young locals, is certainly in the pro-kebab camp.

Once a small dairy shop selling milk and eggs, this tiny latteria in the Porta Nuova neighborhood expanded its menu during the impoverished years that followed World War II to include old-school Milanese dishes.