Restaurants in Italy

A family-run trattoria with a slightly lived-in look (worn tile floors and wood-paneled wainscoting), Settimio all-Arancio near via del Corso and the Spanish Steps serves up classic Roman cuisine with an emphasis on grilled meat and fish and seasonal produce.

Hidden off a blind alley, the Antica Osteria di Vico Palla looks like it hasn’t changed in a century, though its current incarnation dates back only 11 years. Wooden tables are set haphazardly under a low ceiling, and a small chalkboard is propped on each to serve as the menu.

For a unique Florentine experience, book a table on Alle Murate's mezzanine beneath the earliest known frescoed portraits of writers Dante and Boccaccio.

The colorful osteria on the dirt road that leads to Punta Licosa serves delicious local favorites and organic fresh fish.

At the touristy but still vital Buca di Sant Antonio restaurant, lunch on grilled baby goat cooked on the spit along with an artichoke pudding.

Trieste’s famous 19th-century restaurant's décor is slightly kitschy, a sort of Eastern European farmhouse style, and the food, in keeping, is meat. Families are gathered around platters of succulent beef and lamb just off the open grill.

It may be located on the lower level of a ho-hum hotel, but the food that comes out of this diminutive kitchen is anything but.

Located at 7 Via Gonfalone and housed in a 16th-century building, Gonfalone restaurant offers guests the chance to relax and dine inside before a tall, copper-hooded fireplace or beneath lanterns filled with flickering candles.