Italy

Restaurants in Italy

Sozzani’s favorite restaurant is housed in a 500-year-old palazzo and serves the town’s best tortelli di zucca (pumpkin ravioli).

White candles illuminate the communal wooden tables at the family-run L’Enoteca Marcucci, a lively wine bar and restaurant. Michele Marcucci plies wines from his 2,000 label–strong cellar, while his father, Giuseppe, grills butter-soft Tuscan beefsteaks.

Built in a former stone quarry, this family-owned restaurant has an outdoor terrace that juts out over the Gulf of Salerno, providing views of the surrounding cliffs and the yachts floating on the water below.

In the Lazio region, Salvatore Tiscione carries on the duty of chef at this Italian trattoria. Opened in 1936 and still operated by the Trivelloni family, the restaurant has a classic design with black and white checkered floors, soft woods and brick covering the walls, and white table cloths.

Chef Corrado Fasolato uses fresh regional ingredients for his innovative dishes such as a delicious pear-and–sheep-ricotta mousse with raspberry gelée and red-wine sorbet.

It may have slipped a notch or two from its status of celebrity hot spot in the days of Bogie and Jackie O—admittedly it’s now a bit of a tourist trap—but such a relentlessly friendly place is hard to resist.

Dine under the arched brick ceiling of Ristorante Sotto La Mole, housed in a former horse stable by the National Cinema Museum. Thin strands of eggy saffron tajarin are freshened with raw tomato and herbed oil. Rugged hand-shaped agnolotti bulge with roasted meat filling.

In an all-but-hidden alleyway in Anacapri, on the quieter, north side of the island, the Trattoria Il Solitario takes up an outdoor garden in front of a 14th-century bell tower of the Church of Santa Sofia.

Among the regulars at this friendly stalwart of cucina Romana, you’ll find gussied-up old ladies alongside rockers in jeans and Kiss tour shirts—all of whom trust Il Matriciano to bring them unfussy versions of their favorite classic Roman country dishes.