Italy

Restaurants in Italy

Pasquale Torrente, owner of Al Convento restaurant, describes colatura-making (anchovy oil) with a semi-pagan glee: the fishing under a spring moon, the curing in barrels with chestnuts or lemons.

Located in Piazza San Lorenzo, just four blocks from the Spanish Steps, Ciampini is a full-service brasserie, bar, and gelateria known for having some of the best gelato in the city.

With only 24 seats and a strong following, getting a reservation can be a challenge, but if you succeed, you'll be rewarded with fresh seafood—including seasonal specialties like tiny softshell crabs—a varied wine list, and friendly service.

Say you knew some stylish, young, design-conscious Parmesans. And say they’d just redone an old farmhouse outside the city. Their eat-in kitchen might look like Croce di Malta. The concise menu (supple tortelli, fragile polpettine, silky Bavarian cream) changes daily.

You may have to compete with celebs, such as Denzel Washington and Giorgio Armani, for one of the 15 outdoor tables on Puny’s patio, but fortunately, there are another 14 tables inside. The simple dishes like handmade pappardelle pasta with tomato and pesto taste as good indoors as al fresco.

Just steps from the Piazza di Spagna, Ristorante Nino, with a stone-walled exterior, sits along a relatively quiet cobblestone side street.

Opened in 2003, this library/café in the Pigneto district provides a destination for those seeking a good read, a cup of coffee, an organic snack, and spirited conversation. The interior boasts bookshelves and several small tables.

Come for the best plain focaccia.

The ricciola, a fish similar to pompano, is topped with wafer-thin potatoes soaked in olive oil, ringed by olives, then baked in a very hot oven.

You could eat breakfast at this historic, aristocratic landmark every day for three months and never have the same pastry twice. Like all Italians, the Parmesans like their cornetti filled with just a scraping of preserves.