Restaurants in Italy

The Osteria del Tempo Perso ("Inn of Lost Time") is squirreled into cavelike rooms off one of the many narrow alleys in Ostuni, a hilltop cluster of whitewashed buildings nicknamed The White City.

Situated atop La Rinascente, a four-story department store on the edge of Piazza della Repubblica, Terrazza is a small, open-air rooftop café with about a dozen tables. The menu is reasonably priced and includes coffee, tea, wine, and light snacks such as panini and pastries.

Located in Noto’s historical district, Le Ularie restaurant specializes in fresh, simply prepared seafood.

From the outside, this den of seafood looks more like a beach shack than upscale restaurant from one of the city's more recognizable restaurateurs. Chef Renatone, a regular on television, is an imposing figure who likes to make appearances in the dining room for his celebrity-filled clientele.

You won’t find bow-tied waiters or elaborate gourmet dishes at La Casalinga (“The Housewife”). Instead, Florentines—and the occasional tour group—pile in here for the friendly, family atmosphere and the heaped platters of authentic, homemade cuisine.

At this tiny but packed trattoria, diners feast on torta verde, a ricotta-laced, quichelike creation baked in the wood oven.

It started out as a neighborhood wine bar, but over the years, Da Fiore has become an international favorite.

Parmesans take the pulse of their own city at this hectic institution, where the cheap nibbles are strangely better than the panini you pay a lot more for. If all you know of Lambrusco, Emilia-Romagna’s most famous-slash-notorious wine, is disco-era Riunite, Fontana will bring you up to speed.

A tiny restaurant with a delicious cecina (chickpea pancake) and thin-crust pizzas, is always first-rate.

Set in Maddalena Archipelago National Park, and known for its excellent fresh fish. Dinner for two $153.