Restaurants in Italy

Run by the same proprietors who own Casa Bleve—one of Rome’s best enotecas—this wine bar chain offers an impressive list of vintages (including many from the owners’ own Tuscan vineyard, Marchesi de’ Frescobaldi).

Chefs Omar Barsacchi and Gionata d’Alessi serve Tuscan-Maremman cuisine like ravioli stuffed with pappa al pomodoro.

A platter of sbrisolona sits on a counter inside the front door, a good start. The menu gives the age and maker of the prosciutto (28 months, Leporati), and culatello (20 months, Consorzio di Zibello), another excellent sign.

A lively restaurant in a brick cellar in the town center. Try the creamy scrambled eggs with grated truffles.

Located in the village of Ponteromito and operating since 1908, this restaurant serves traditional, regional dishes. Homemade pasta dishes, like ricotta-stuffed ravioli topped with a walnut and mushroom sauce, are specialties.

A five-minute drive north of Lucca is the glass- walled dining room at the Michelin-starred Ristorante La Mora. With just 10 tables, the low-key restaurant is disturbed only occasionally by the faint roar of a passing train.

Throughout the Campania region of southern Italy, the Fischetti family is famous for their restaurant in Vallesaccarda Avellino, which for three generations has served Irpinian dishes like ricotta ravioli in walnut sauce, fusilli with artichokes and lamb meatballs, and rabbit in spicy tomato sauc

Positano’s most stylish bar and restaurant serves freshly made, regionally sourced dishes—like fried ravioli with ricotta and mozzarella on a bed of fresh tomatoes—in a slick interior with floor cushions and a softly lit courtyard.

Every morning owner Cristian Ponzini sails out on Como to catch lavarello and other native fish to serve at his glass-walled restaurant. Ponzini is one of the few who have fishing rights on the lake—a privilege that has been passed down through his family for generations.

Well-heeled tourists and visiting celebrities have been coming to Harry's Bar, a Venice institution, since Giuseppe Cipriani opened it right on the St. Mark's waterfront in 1931.

Venice’s most authentic osteria. Inside, patrons fill up on Venetian cicheti such as lightly spiced meatballs, a pre-dinner favorite.